Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We piled the family into our 2014 Pilot and head down to Crater Lake for a few days recently. Being this is the wifes vehicle, I don't get to drive it that much. So while I had the comm for most of the trip, I noticed that when braking at highway speeds there was a nice shudder. It wasn't apparent during around town driving, which is what this Pilot mostly sees. So at 60k, I chucked up the shuddering to warped rotors. MPG (btw) was 27 on one looooong, straight hwy maintaining 55mph. While back on I-5 and averaging around 75mph, we got 24mpg. This was with five people and gear/luggage. Go Pilot!!
So I get back and order the pads and rotors from Rock Auto. I went with the drilled and slotted rotors (front and rear) and ceramic pads all the way around. Same set up that I have for my Tahoe SSV. It all arrived in less than a week. Sweet.
Total time for doing the front and rear was around 90 minutes with interruptions from the kids.
What made it go really smooth was that I had a Rigid 18v impact wrench. I used it for the lug nuts, the front caliper and bracket bolts and the two rotor screws. On the rear calipers I just used box wrenches. Still pretty easy, all bolts removed by hand.
What I really loved about doing the brakes on our Pilot was the way the caliper comes off by itself and the pads are held separately by the bracket (on both front and rear). Dang easiest brakes to do. Kudos to Honda's design engineers. If you are going to do the brakes and replace the rotors, I would suggest either and impact wrench of some kind or an impact driver simply because those two screws that hold the rotor on are a bugger. I read where some guys drilled them out and replaced them. I would have done the same if i didn't have the impact wrench. Additional things to consider purchasing are brake lube grease for the caliper slide pins and rear of pads and copper anti seize compound for the studs. I have a couple of jars of it from NAPA but they get expensive in that size. You can get small packets of both at most auto parts stores.
So, after seating the pads in I took it for a test drive down 217. No more shudder when braking from hwy speeds.
Thank you Rock Auto. Old and new brake pics attached. Bottom line...this is one of the most ridiculously easy brake jobs to do on any vehicle.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,293 Posts
Nice job! Most vehicles have easy brakes now... not like the old days where part of the bearing race is integral to the rotor so you had to deal with bearings too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cigars

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,293 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: aggrex and Wickit

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,293 Posts
How else to dispel the myth?
I understand, but much like my mother it's how you approach the situation. A nice little lead-in sentence makes it seem way more friendly than just pasting a link. You deliver like my mom: "You're not gonna want me to ask this, but...".
 

·
Registered
2008 Piot SE FWD, 2015 Pilot LX 4WD. 2005 GSX-R1000
Joined
·
2,188 Posts
THANK YOU! I've seen other myth busting. Hadn't seen this one, thanks!

I just did a post about doing the fronts on my 08 pilot this morning. Only because the pads were getting thin. SOOooooo, NO new rotors. Didn't 'have them turned' either.

Warp a rotor? In a bad crash- maybe. Oh, the pedal can pulsate, sure, NOT from warped rotors. And I agree that replacing all of just about everything usually DOES fix the pulsating brake pedal- so it's chocked up to 'must have been the 'warped rotor' I replaced.

OP- Nice work, I wish my 08 looked that corrosion free in there!
Glad it took care of it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cigars

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,793 Posts
I understand, but much like my mother it's how you approach the situation. A nice little lead-in sentence makes it seem way more friendly than just pasting a link. You deliver like my mom: "You're not gonna want me to ask this, but...".
I used to try to sugarcoat that message, but if the OP doesn't take the time to first search this forum for "warped rotors" and to see previous posts in that regard, then he sets himself up to receive the more direct version.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I used to try to sugarcoat that message, but if the OP doesn't take the time to first search this forum for "warped rotors" and to see previous posts in that regard, then he sets himself up to receive the more direct version.
Hey, great article! I don't disagree with anything stated in there. We can talk all day about lateral run out and rotor thickness variation. Having run large auto centers, I've seen quit a bit. There's obviously several dynamics that can cause shaking in the front end, rotors just being one of the problems. Another culprit would be worn suspension and steering components or even tires. At 60k though, the front end on the Pilot was pretty tight and I just put a new set of Michelin Defenders on it. Could I have put the rotors on a lathe and resurfaced them? Sure, if there was still enough meat on them. At 60k though I felt that the most simple and logical route would be to just replace the rotors and pads and put the brakes back up to 100%. Time wise, it would have took me the extra time to mic the rotors and take them to get turned. If they were still thick enough to get turned then they probably wouldn't give me another 60k being that they were now even thinner. As well, if only one rotor had serious run out and more surface had to be removed, then there wouldn't be even heat dissipation on left and right rotors. Kind of splitting hairs there but with all new rotors and pads, you are bringing the brake system back to OEM new conditions. Sorry if I didn't tear the front end apart searching for the obscure but my call was to cut to the chase. Sorry if it turned out well.

Cheers.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nice job! Most vehicles have easy brakes now... not like the old days where part of the bearing race is integral to the rotor so you had to deal with bearings too.
Nothing beat those caliper pins on the old Ford brakes. Amazing how cheap and simple they were but they worked great. Then there were those composite rotors....:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
So I get back and order the pads and rotors from Rock Auto. I went with the drilled and slotted rotors (front and rear) and ceramic pads all the way around. Same set up that I have for my Tahoe SSV. It all arrived in less than a week. Sweet.
What's the verdict after several months? Which pads/rotors did you get from Rock Auto? I have to do the same repair and am looking for pad/rotor recommendations.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What's the verdict after several months? Which pads/rotors did you get from Rock Auto? I have to do the same repair and am looking for pad/rotor recommendations.
The verdict is.... the vented/slotted front rotors warped. Maybe around 25k miles on them. Apparently this is kind of a common and persistent problem on the Pilot's and Odyssey's. Some will argue that it's a run out issue, OK. If you want to sit there with your run out gauge checking it, that's fine. Sure, you could always have the rotors turned down but depending how much they have to be cut down, you lose rotor thickness and heat dissipation. So I ordered a set of premium rotors and premium ceramic pads from my local NAPA. The rear drilled/slotted rotors are fine. Replacing the front pads and rotors only takes about 15 minutes per wheel so no biggie. While Honda under engineered the brakes on these Pilot's, there design on the brakes for caliper and pad removal is one of the best I have ever seen. So while I fully expect these rotors to warp again, I will just chuck them and change them out as needed. The next time I won't go with NAPA's premium, just something cheaper since they're basically just wear items anyway. I'm just curious to see how NAPA's premium's do. Those slotted/drilled rotors from Rock Auto were fantastic though before they warped. I also have them on my Tahoe SSV and I have had zero problems. I also put them on my kids Scion XB. Again, no problems.
Also, this time I left out the rotor screws. I know that some people will argue this point but they are just there for the assembly line. No problems running without them. Front end is smooth as silk once again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,793 Posts
The verdict is.... the vented/slotted front rotors warped. Maybe around 25k miles on them. Apparently this is kind of a common and persistent problem on the Pilot's and Odyssey's. Some will argue that it's a run out issue, OK. If you want to sit there with your run out gauge checking it, that's fine. Sure, you could always have the rotors turned down but depending how much they have to be cut down, you lose rotor thickness and heat dissipation. So I ordered a set of premium rotors and premium ceramic pads from my local NAPA. The rear drilled/slotted rotors are fine. Replacing the front pads and rotors only takes about 15 minutes per wheel so no biggie. While Honda under engineered the brakes on these Pilot's, there design on the brakes for caliper and pad removal is one of the best I have ever seen. So while I fully expect these rotors to warp again, I will just chuck them and change them out as needed. The next time I won't go with NAPA's premium, just something cheaper since they're basically just wear items anyway. I'm just curious to see how NAPA's premium's do. Those slotted/drilled rotors from Rock Auto were fantastic though before they warped. I also have them on my Tahoe SSV and I have had zero problems. I also put them on my kids Scion XB. Again, no problems.
Also, this time I left out the rotor screws. I know that some people will argue this point but they are just there for the assembly line. No problems running without them. Front end is smooth as silk once again.
Exactly which pads were the ones you bought from RockAuto?

Have you tried cleaning the surface of the rotors with a flex-hone tool?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
^^^ This

My experience with 'warped rotor syndrome' on our Pilot has been that it's an uneven pad material deposition problem on the friction faces, and that the rotors themselves have not been warped. I've removed the pad material from the rotor faces a couple different ways, and solved the pulsing-pedal symptom by doing so. I've also adjusted my braking methods to avoid having pads clamped hard on a hot rotor while stopped. Results: no pulsing pedal any more.

Choosing the "right" pad for your driving demands is key, in my opinion. Our Pilot is still on original pads at about 55k, with 8-10mm of pad material remaining. A friend who tows his race car behind his Pilot has installed some performance pads and says it all stops great with them on factory rotors. I will likely try those when I finally need brakes. Until then, we are all in data-gathering and learning mode, gathering info from members here about what works for them and what's no better than original.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Daltongang

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
I actually wonder if the problem is driving too mildly. I'm half tempted to beat on ours with late braking and ACTUALLY getting the brakes hot next time it starts doing it and see if that helps. Currently running whatever PowerStop or whatever Rock Auto sells and they seem to dust a little more and so far so good with pulstation. Fingers crossed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,293 Posts
I actually wonder if the problem is driving too mildly. I'm half tempted to beat on ours with late braking and ACTUALLY getting the brakes hot next time it starts doing it and see if that helps. Currently running whatever PowerStop or whatever Rock Auto sells and they seem to dust a little more and so far so good with pulstation. Fingers crossed.
Not to get into a huge debate here but it is known that pad deposits are what causes the issue on Hondas... if you catch it early you can "re-break in" the pads which should scrub the high spot off and recoat the rotors with friction material. It is critical you go for a decent drive without stopping though to allow everything to cool down or you will bake material back onto the rotor.

I've heard of people on this forum and DriveAccord successfully completing this procedure and getting longer life out of their OEM parts. I am not the primary driver and don't need my wife to tell me her car shakes every 6 months so I replaced the rotors and pads with Centric axle packs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: briantii

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,477 Posts
The procedure Daltongang links to is also the procedure needed to remove the old pad deposits and build a new even layer. With the relatively tiny (for the weight of the Pilot...) brakes we so enjoy, three of the hard-stop cycles builds plenty heat for getting things working correctly. My one-Pilot experience on the original pads, though. Cavitat Emptee (skull is vacant).

My big driving adjustment is that I start braking a little earlier and more gently on the pedal, then be sure to avoid holding the pedal down hard when the car is finally stopped. I think avoiding the heat from the harder stop and the extra clamping from foot hard on the pedal while stopped is what's keeping the pulsing-pedal symptom from coming back.

-----

When we first got the Pilot, we lived above (literally) Los Angeles, on one of the hills of Glendale. Long steep 1/4-mile downhill driveway going out, stop at the gate while it opened, then more windy downhill on narrow streets to "civilization" down below. Our immediate freeway off-ramps tended to be sloping downhill to a traffic light, so it was common to need harder braking from traffic speed. Within a couple thousand miles, the pedal was pulsing. :( I measured the rotors for runout and uneven thickness, and found both well within normal limits. Of course I cleaned the rotor friction faces before measuring, and the pulsing magically disappeared after everything was reassembled. I initially attributed the issue to uneven wheel nut torque, ...until the pulsing returned. The internet is a giant suppository repository of shared knowledge, and The Gargle brought me to discussions here that included frequent rotor replacement as a common symptom-killer, and also the discussions of the uneven pad deposition theory. The second better fit my immediate experience, so I got to test the re-bedding method to confirm it as the cause. It did. In the 50k or so since then, I've only needed to re-bed the pads a couple times after pulsing started to sneak back under the pedal again.

My conclusion: Try the re-bedding procedure before you start spending on new rotors and pads. It takes only a few minutes and costs nothing. If you can, adjust your stopping habits so you avoid having the pads clamped hard around a hot rotor. If you can't, or perhaps you share the brake pedal with someone less disciplined, you can always go through that re-bedding effort again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
Not to get into a huge debate here but it is known that pad deposits are what causes the issue on Hondas... if you catch it early you can "re-break in" the pads which should scrub the high spot off and recoat the rotors with friction material. It is critical you go for a decent drive without stopping though to allow everything to cool down or you will bake material back onto the rotor.

I've heard of people on this forum and DriveAccord successfully completing this procedure and getting longer life out of their OEM parts. I am not the primary driver and don't need my wife to tell me her car shakes every 6 months so I replaced the rotors and pads with Centric axle packs.
Yeah I guess that's what I'm getting at. The car isn't abused or even braked hard.... sooo maybe next time it starts doing it I just beat on it to see if it helps.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top