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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daytime running lights quit working yet all the fuses seem to be fine that pertain to the front lights. I was told it might be the relay but no one can tell me which relay it is or where the relay is located. Does anyone know where the relay is or has had this problem and figured out what the problem is? If it's a fuse, any idea which one it is? I recently upgraded to LED lamps and they were working great for about a week before this happened. Any information would be greatly appreciated. Please contact me at [email protected]. Vic Stein

Other than that, we love our Pilot Elite. It currently has 89,458 miles on it and it's perfect for us when we have ice and snow. During the winter, I use Nokian Hakapelita tires because they are designed specifically for winter driving. I've seen others complaining about their experience in the snow and I think it's because they are using all-season tires.
 

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I didn't even know that Honda offered an "Elite" model in 2013. :unsure:
 

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Caught me in a "mood".

[rant mode]
Generally, posts that include "email me your answers at don'[email protected]" will die dry and barren as far as I'm concerned. If the OP can't find the time & energy to swing by and read the answers, I'm similarly short on time & energy to write them. Plus I have no interest in casually broadcasting my e-mail details into a black hole.
[/rant mode]

What car are we talking about? Is it a 2013, or an "Elite"? Can't be both.

On the 2013, DRL functions are managed by a controller labelled MICU, part of the under-dash fuse and relay assembly by the driver's knee. There is no "DRL Relay" to replace, as the DRL lighting logic and control is managed with a PWM controller that needs no relay. Fitting LED bulbs in the high-beam position usually causes desired operation. Unless of course, you try to fit the wrong bulbs or damage the wiring on the way in or out. The light bulbs themselves are fused, plus there's a specific control fuse for the DRL function that's separate from that fuse for the high-beam bulbs. Fuses 12 and 13 in the underdash fuse and relay panel or the ones that protect the wiring and control module.

If this is genuinely a Pilot Elite, you should post your question in the appropriate forum for the year of your car.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Caught me in a "mood".

[rant mode]
Generally, posts that include "email me your answers at don'[email protected]" will die dry and barren as far as I'm concerned. If the OP can't find the time & energy to swing by and read the answers, I'm similarly short on time & energy to write them. Plus I have no interest in casually broadcasting my e-mail details into a black hole.
[/rant mode]

What car are we talking about? Is it a 2013, or an "Elite"? Can't be both.

On the 2013, DRL functions are managed by a controller labelled MICU, part of the under-dash fuse and relay assembly by the driver's knee. There is no "DRL Relay" to replace, as the DRL lighting logic and control is managed with a PWM controller that needs no relay. Fitting LED bulbs in the high-beam position usually causes desired operation. Unless of course, you try to fit the wrong bulbs or damage the wiring on the way in or out. The light bulbs themselves are fused, plus there's a specific control fuse for the DRL function that's separate from that fuse for the high-beam bulbs. Fuses 12 and 13 in the underdash fuse and relay panel or the ones that protect the wiring and control module.

If this is genuinely a Pilot Elite, you should post your question in the appropriate forum for the year of your car.
I'm sorry, it's a 2013 Touring. The service manager called it an Elite when I asked him about it. He's the one that said the problem was a relay. I've checked fuses 12 and 13 and they are fine. My yardman put my new LED bulbs in trying to help me and he did cross them at first. So I guess he may have damaged the PWM controller. I really appreciate this information. Now I need to see if I can get one.
 

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The MICU is a canbus-communicating smart module, and is keyed to the PCM and the rest of the car. They were in the $800 range new last time I looked. IIRC, HDS is needed (read: dealer) to get the MICU "registered" to the car. Others may be able to confirm this detail.

There's another fuse for the DRL module itself. I need to dig deeper to find it, but have a client call this morning I need to prep for. I'll get back to this later.
 

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The other fuse is #37 in the under-dash fuse & relay panel, labelled "Day Light". This fuse protects the DRL circuitry in the MICU, separate from the other fuses, which protect the wiring to the bulbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The other fuse is #37 in the under-dash fuse & relay panel, labeled "Day Light". This fuse protects the DRL circuitry in the MICU, separate from the other fuses, which protect the wiring to the bulbs.
I tried that one too and it's good. If I replace the PCM, does it have to be programmed to be able to work with the MICU?
 

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I don't know for sure. I haven't needed to replace that yet, and at this point I'm not anticipating doing so. I started looking at some options for lighting, and particularly a way to alter the turn signal rate with LED bulbs, but ditched that though when I saw the costs and the potential canbus issues. Costs first...

The modules themselves are very well protected from user-induced damage, evidenced by the multiple fusing used. Further, since the MICU is a "smart module", your dealer can do a lot of diagnosis on the module itself via the HDS (Honda Diagnostic System). Might be a good investment just paying for that service, vs the aggravation of spending the replacement $$ even if it is in fact a plug-and-play. You might find a used MICU module at a pick-your-part yard for cheap, and just try it in the car. I didn't have that option locally, unfortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't know for sure. I haven't needed to replace that yet, and at this point, I'm not anticipating doing so. I started looking at some options for lighting, and particularly a way to alter the turn signal rate with LED bulbs, but ditched that though when I saw the costs and the potential canbus issues. Costs first...

The modules themselves are very well protected from user-induced damage, evidenced by the multiple fusing used. Further, since the MICU is a "smart module", your dealer can do a lot of diagnosis on the module itself via the HDS (Honda Diagnostic System). Might be a good investment just paying for that service, vs the aggravation of spending the replacement $$ even if it is in fact a plug-and-play. You might find a used MICU module at a pick-your-part yard for cheap, and just try it in the car. I didn't have that option locally, unfortunately.
Thank you very much. Currently, it's our only vehicle my wife can drive when she's up to it. She has ovarian cancer and the chemo really knocks her down for about a week and a half. She gets a 5 1/2 hour treatment every 3 weeks of some very strong stuff. In the middle of next month I should be picking up my new truck in Boise, Idaho so after that would be a good time to take our Pilot in and get it checked out. I may see if I can take it in and see if they can get it done in one day, hopefully, this week. I just don't drive it at night since the low beams don't work.

Stay safe, Vic Stein
Yakima, WA
 

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Vic --

Your original post said nothing about low beam operation. All was focused on DRL function.

For the low beams: Look at fuse 21 (20A) in the under-dash fuse relay panel. This is the only fuse specific to both low-beam bulbs. Then, fuse 17 (15A) protects wiring to the left low beam, and fuse 16 (15A) protects wiring to the right low beam.

Fuse 4 (50A) in the main under-hood fuse/relay box protects all the exterior lighting circuits including low beams, high beams, parking/marker, and DRL's. It's hard to blow this fuse. But if it has opened, you pretty much have no headlight-switch lights.

Test fuses with a meter or test light, as some may pass visual but not functional testing.


You and your wife have my sympathy. Chemo is poisoning just short of death. Good end results are certainly worth the side effects, but it's easy to lose that perspective on the way. Stay with it and godspeed in your journey!
 
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