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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi piloteers. I’m in the market for some quality (but not over priced) blacked out or at least dark headlights and tail lights for my 2013 HONDA Pilot Touring model.

Other than being cool/good looking ....the only requirement is that they adhere to Missouri state laws and are as dark/black looking as possible. If I tint them myself they won’t adhere to laws or at least I won’t pass inspection. But as I understand it, if I purchase a manufactured set from a reputable maker, I should be fine.

Does anyone have any recommendations on this? Thanks in advance
 

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Hi piloteers. I’m in the market for some quality (but not over priced) blacked out or at least dark headlights and tail lights for my 2013 HONDA Pilot Touring model.

Other than being cool/good looking ....the only requirement is that they adhere to Missouri state laws and are as dark/black looking as possible. If I tint them myself they won’t adhere to laws or at least I won’t pass inspection. But as I understand it, if I purchase a manufactured set from a reputable maker, I should be fine.

Does anyone have any recommendations on this? Thanks in advance
Back in the days of flying airplanes, we used to tint polycarbonate canopies by soaking them in RIT dye. We used black and controlled the amount of tint by how long we left the plastic in the solution. Not suggesting you do that, but it's a viable option you may not have been aware of. If interested in trying it, practice on a piece of polycarbonate about the same thickness as your headlight lenses before doing the real thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Back in the days of flying airplanes, we used to tint polycarbonate canopies by soaking them in RIT dye. We used black and controlled the amount of tint by how long we left the plastic in the solution. Not suggesting you do that, but it's a viable option you may not have been aware of. If interested in trying it, practice on a piece of polycarbonate about the same thickness as your headlight lenses before doing the real thing.
Anything I add to the factory lights will prevent me from passing safety inspection in Missouri. So this isn’t an option. Has to be made by a reputable manufacturer.
 

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Anything I add to the factory lights will prevent me from passing safety inspection in Missouri. So this isn’t an option. Has to be made by a reputable manufacturer.
How does Missouri inspection handle oxidized headlight lenses? Is there a lux reading min or just aim? Do they keep a list of reputable manufacturers and do you have to show a receipt?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Anything added to the lense that blocks the original projection is considered “obstructing the headlight” and won’t pass safety inspection.

They have to comply with all federal and DOT regulations, satisfy FMVSS code no. 108 and be ISO-9000 and ISO-9002 certified
 

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Headlights and tail lights are supposed to be bright and visible for a reason. Like..umm...to prevent accidents. Why you are considering this...I don't know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Headlights and tail lights are supposed to be bright and visible for a reason. Like..umm...to prevent accidents. Why you are considering this...I don't know.
I’m assuming you haven’t seen manufacturer black lights.

I’m not talking about tinting the lenses or smoking out the headlights. I’m talking about manufactured black headlights. The bulbs (or LEDs) are still white and very bright. The plastic covering the headlight is still clear. The only thing that’s black is the metal reflecting parts on the inside and the body.

Point being...they are just as bright (many of them brighter because they’re LED) as standard headlights.
 

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Anything added to the lense that blocks the original projection is considered “obstructing the headlight” and won’t pass safety inspection.

They have to comply with all federal and DOT regulations, satisfy FMVSS code no. 108 and be ISO-9000 and ISO-9002 certified
Oh ok, I guess I had the wrong impression about what "blacked out" or "dark" headlights are searching on those words and finding these. I thought they looked like this which would seem to block the original projection. But, at any rate, please just disregard my temporary state of confusion.
143766
 

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Long ago someone here posted about disassembling headlight to black out the non reflective surfaces.
seem to recall it involved baking the heading etc etc...
Nothing on EBay?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Long ago someone here posted about disassembling headlight to black out the non reflective surfaces.
seem to recall it involved baking the heading etc etc...
Nothing on EBay?
I found some ok looking ones on eBay. Purchased them. Funds removed from my account. Two days later the seller said they’re supplier was out of stock. Gave me a refund. Now I can’t find any that aren’t either on back order or over $1000 for a custom set.

If anyone finds ANY for around the $150-$300 range for the pair, please share a link.

Thanks friends!
 

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My recommendation is to bake your OEM headlights and paint what you want blacked out. NO aftermarket unit will be the same quality as the OEM headlights.
 
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My recommendation is to bake your OEM headlights and paint what you want blacked out. NO aftermarket unit will be the same quality as the OEM headlights.
^^^ This ^^^ You get to reuse the factory lenses, so all the original DOT markings are there at inspection time.

Take a look at "The Retrofit Store" for some good guidance on how the headlights come apart with some oven time. Grab the grey vinyl sealant strips while you are there for the reassembly.

Several Pilot owners have done a projector conversion too, which allows for more 'black' area in the housing at least around the main reflector section. The reflectors for high beam and turn signal will need to stay as original, but you can do a little tasteful black strip detailing around and between those. A bit of work and expense, but significantly improves the lighting over the factory candles. In my opinion anyway.
 
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I doubt you'll find many DOT approved aftermarket headlight units. When you throw in the ISO manufacturing requirements it gets nearly impossible. Then you add in your budget I'd say it's truly impossible. I do not believe there is such as thing as a quality DOT standard meeting headlight assembly that's blacked out that meets ISO standards for less than $300. Chances are anything you found on eBay was junk anyway.

Not that you asked, but I'd personally leave it alone. It's basically a 4 door minivan that's cool factor comes entirely from its utilitarian nature. If you want to do something useful - wash it, wax it, vacuum it, change the fluids, and by all means disable VCM if you haven't already. :)
 

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Long ago someone here posted about disassembling headlight to black out the non reflective surfaces.
seem to recall it involved baking the heading etc etc...
Nothing on EBay?
This requires a lot of patience. I baked a Volvo tailight once to address the corrosion inside. It worked. However, I subsequently cracked a VW light when slowly prying it apart even after baking it in a 225 degree oven for a while.
 

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This requires a lot of patience. I baked a Volvo tailight once to address the corrosion inside. It worked. However, I subsequently cracked a VW light when slowly prying it apart even after baking it in a 225 degree oven for a while.
Having performed multiple retrofits, I will say that almost nothing about retrofitting involves skill. It's ALL patience and not rushing the steps. Not all headlights are created the same (as you found out) but I've never heard of someone breaking a Honda housing or lens while separating them, and the Pilot is my third Honda retrofitted and I was on each forum for years discussing these items. It's by far the best way to get the best results, but it takes a tremendous amount of time. This is why the companies that do retrofits charge around $1,000 for a pretty basic retrofit.

Sometimes the old saying is true, you have to pay to get the best.
 
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This requires a lot of patience. I baked a Volvo tailight once to address the corrosion inside. It worked. However, I subsequently cracked a VW light when slowly prying it apart even after baking it in a 225 degree oven for a while.
In my limited experience, 225ºF isn't reliably warm enough to fully soften the adhesive holding the lens on. As cintocrunch shares, patience is essential. If you find that the 'prying' effort as any more than minimal, not enough temp and/or not enough time.
 
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