Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For my wife's 2012 Pilot EX-L AWD, is this the correct sequence for bleeding the brakes?

  1. Front Driver
  2. Front Passenger
  3. Rear Passenger
  4. Rear Driver
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
That will be good enough. With the dual circuit brakes, the front- or rear-first order isn't as important as it used to be. the individual wheel circuits are split starting at the ABS unit, so no real advantage doing a long or short circuit first.

Perhaps the Most Important Thing To Remember is to NOT LET THE RESERVOIR LEVEL GET LOW as you are bleeding. Getting air out of the ABS pump is more than a chore. Engine off while bleeding.


----

I use a pressure bleeder rather than a pump-and-bleed method. It seems to work well, at least so far. Best available method on the German touring car. K's gen3 4Runner likes a combination of pedal and the using the rear ABS circuits via the ABS pump. Not all cars like pressure bleeding it turns out. Toyota uses their $$ diagnostic computer to supervise bleeding, but I don't have one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the reply. The sequence I listed I had found while searching specific to this 2012 Pilot.

Here is a sequence that I drafted based on some other good searches on the internet and another forum. Somewhat baby steps included, but want it to be detailed. Probably will bleed her brakes this weekend or next.

1. Lift Car
a. Park in center of garage
b. Set car to Park
c. Loosen lug nuts on all 4 tires in star pattern (OR BETTER ONE WHEEL AT A TIME WHEN BLEEDING???)
d. Lift car with jack under rear tow hook. Or one side at a time.
e. Slide lack stands into position. May need 1-2” boards under stands for Pilot.
f. Lower car onto jack stands
g. Remove lug nuts and set aside
h. Remove wheels and set aside.
i. Lean on car to ensure secure on jack stands.​
2. Setup and prep
a. Prep drain bottles and hose(s). Ensure bottle is clean. Fill ~1/3 with new brake fluid. Fully submerge hose into bottle and fluid.
b. Clean thoroughly around master cylinder
c. Remove master cylinder cap.
d. Fill master cylinder to at or just above the MAX level line. DO NOT SPILL!
e. Place cap back onto master cylinder.
f. Place 2x4 behind brake pedal to prevent over-travel.​
3. Brake Bleed Sequence
a. Front Driver
b. Front Passenger
c. Rear Passenger
d. Rear Driver​
4. Brake Bleed Procedure
a. If present, remove brake bleed rubber cap.
b. Attach brake hose to nipple.
c. Run the hose upward through the spring then down into the bottle.
d. Gently open the bleeder valve. Not too far, but just until flow starts. Maybe ¼ turn.
e. Pump the pedal several times all the way to the top and all the way to the 2x4. 10-11 times is fine. IMPORTANT: Do not let fluid in master cylinder go below the MIN line.
f. Check the bleeder hose for air bubbles. If there are any at all, even small ones coming out quickly, go back, refill the reservoir, and pump the pedal some more.
g. When all the air is out, close the bleeder valve. Tighten to 8 N*m (6 lbf*ft).
h. Replace rubber cap if it was present.
i. Again, fill master cylinder to at or just above the MAX level line.
j. Repeat for the remaining wheels per the Brake Bleed Sequence.​
5. Lower Car
a. Replace all wheels with finger tightened lug nuts.
b. Lift car slightly and remove jack stands.
c. Lower car onto ground.
d. Using torque wrench, tighten all lug nuts in star pattern. Tighten to 94 lbf*ft​
6. Final steps
a. Drive around and test
b. Take used fluid to recycler/disposal: Earth911.com - More Ideas, Less Waste
7. Clean up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
Sounds good!

Some more thoughts...

I use a plastic trash bag taped over the fender into the engine bay to protect the paint from any accidental drips. Old towel wrapped around under the master cylinder catches more dribbles. Brake fluid does a number on paint, so any contact is bad.

A cheap turkey-baster will help you get old fluid out of the reservoir before you start the actual bleeding process. Unless there's already air in the system, this is more of a "flush and replace" than a bleed, so getting as much of the old out this way will lessen the amount you'll be left to push through. The shape of the reservoir demands that I put a short length of small tube in the end to snake down into the main part of the reservoir

I use Valvoline DOT3/4 synthetic fluid, commonly available from local parts places. The DOT4 rating offers higher dry and wet boiling points. Not as important with the Pilot as some of the other performance toys in the garage. So I only need to keep one brake fluid for all of them.

----

I cheat at home. I have the pressure bleeder (a dedicated small garden sprayer with fittings that go where the cap normally sits) so the flush process is a lot easier. Open the bleed valve, catch the fluid via a clear vinyl hose. When the old slightly yellow/brown fluid changes to clear, close the valve and move to the next wheel. You can buy a "MOTIV" brand unit with fittings and cap adapters from you favorite online resource and have it magically appear via brown truck. It's really tough to run the reservoir dry with the bleeder full.

There's a two-post Max-Jax lift in the workbay too, saving a bunch of the jack-and-jackstands steps involved with the process. It's a back saver for sure. I'm getting too old to be climbing up, down, and around under cars with floor jacks and stands. Wish I'd invested a decade or two earlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks again for the tips. I performed the brake like flush yesterday and seemed fine. I used my wife's turkey baster to suck out fluid from the reservoir first (I now owe her a new one) and placed a garbage bag over the area in case of drips. Bought 2 bottles, but barely made it with 1 bottle of the Pennzoil DOT 3 brake fluid. Really didn't have bubbles coming out, but the fluid was darker than the new stuff so it was apparent when flushed. Tested out and had her drive it. Honestly seemed no different, but it was just over 2 years so worth performing for just $7 in fluid...plus a turkey baster :) Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
844 Posts
Thanks again for the tips. I performed the brake like flush yesterday and seemed fine. I used my wife's turkey baster to suck out fluid from the reservoir first (I now owe her a new one) and placed a garbage bag over the area in case of drips. Bought 2 bottles, but barely made it with 1 bottle of the Pennzoil DOT 3 brake fluid. Really didn't have bubbles coming out, but the fluid was darker than the new stuff so it was apparent when flushed. Tested out and had her drive it. Honestly seemed no different, but it was just over 2 years so worth performing for just $7 in fluid...plus a turkey baster :) Thanks!
Good news!

FYI, the brake fluid change interval is every three years, regardless of mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
One of the higher-performance garage mates gets brake fluid changed at its factory-recommended two-year intervals if it doesn't see track days. Those demand no more than six months between changes. Once I have the fluid and all the tools out, I just do all of the cars in one session, at least for the two-year interval changes.

The discoloration of the fluid is rust/corrosion due to moisture that the fluid likes to absorb from surrounding air. By the time you start to see the fluid getting darker than new, you are really past the ideal change interval. That staining is from the iron/steel in the system that's been liberated by the corrosion process. The system will last indefinitely if the fluid is renewed regularly, before the corrosion gets a foothold.

In my opinion anyway. :)
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top