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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over the past couple months I've studied every video and piece of information I could find on the internet to help elleviate any issues I would have on my repairs of the timing belt and related parts. I purchased impact wrenches, digital torque wrench and anything else recommended for this repair. and Today, while disassembling some things, I immediately noticed my engine isnt the same one in the videos Ive studied and I dont know if I even have the correct parts any more. One of the videos from 1A Auto shows a pulley tensioner near the drive shaft. I dont see that on mine. Can anyone please help? Im trying to do this in the rain in South Florida and has been a pain in the ass. I was able to remove the crankshaft using the Lyle tool and 1/2 cordless harbor freight impact. Ive removed to serp belt and now am attempting to remove the belt pulleys. This is the video ive been wacthing:
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Try this one

 

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Good video for folks who already know which end of the screwdriver does the work.

* I have not changed he timing belt yet on the Pilot .* That said, there are a couple things I'd like to share:

--- There is no bolt in this whole project that doesn't deserve a torque wrench for assembly.
--- The 6mm (ones with 10mm head) bolts get 8-9 lbs/ft, or more importantly they get 96-108 lbs/inch. Use a 1/4"-drive lbs/inch torque wrench for these. The larger torque wrenches will be out of their reliable range of accuracy for these small bolts. In the video, the comment on some of the bolts is by hand and "tight enough". On the 6mm bolts, like the water pump, bracket and belt cover bolts, you really doen't want to stretch or strip the threads from the block or head, don't want to break the part you are attaching.
-- The 8mm bolts typically get 14-16 lbs/ft into aluminum. If you don't have a spec for a specific 8mm bolt, substitute this number.

-- The presenter suggests adding blue LocTite to every fastener. Unless the manual calls for it specifically, I recommend that you install fasteners clean and dry.

-- On the water pump seal, I'm not normally a fan of using any gasket sealer, nor the grease or oil that the presenter suggests. I like Hylomar, which you can buy with a Permatex brand name on it. It's like silicone that never dries or runs out, so you can guarantee a good seal and still gate the pump off easily and cleanly next time, no scraping of the block face.

-- Drain the coolant via the block galley drain, as well as from the radiator drain cock as shown in the video. The radiator drain only gets the coolant that's above the hose connections on the block. The galley drain on the rear of the block gets the rest, so you don't get that mess of coolant to clean up when you pull the pump.

-- I love power tools for some of the disassembly, but they are back in the drawers before assembly begins. Virtually every assembly step has you fitting steel bolts into aluminum, so even a mild cross-thread turns into a helicoil or time-sert thread repair once a power tool tries to turn the bolt. I have a vintage (as I am...) Blue Point pneumatic ratchet that makes a whopping 30 lbs/ft of max torque for removing most fasteners.

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Hello, my name is bob and I'm a tool-o-holic. I can quit anytime I want to. But I love the feeling that comes with having the right tools for the job.

Projects like this usually include a lay-down table. Parts that come off get placed in order of removal, starting at the far end of the table. Then pieces are cleaned or replaced with new on the table, maintaining the order removed. Fasteners are grouped with the pieces or placed in their holes on those pieces, so the right pieces go back exactly where they came from. Clean the block and service area completely before you start assembling. I have a dedicated piece of indoor-outdoor carpet that goes on the floor under the project, so dropped pieces don't get damaged, and fasteners don't plink and go hide. I use plastic dishpan tubs for each step, keeping the bits together on their way to laydown.

On complex projects I often place a couple video cameras and narrate the steps. Very Handy for recalling how and where something came off so it can go back to the right place in the right order.
 

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So it's good to have a 3/8" torque wrench and 1/2"? So nervous about doing this next year. I'm at 95k now. I have changed the spark plugs. What's a good brand toque wrench that won't break the bank? Done mechanical work my whole life but have never done a timing belt or anything more in depth than that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ive learned that my engine is a different one than one i the video. Its a J35? model I believe. I found another video that seems to line up with my model.
. I have everything off now and am getting ready to put on the new water pump. but its raining, again. I ordered a new serpentine belt tensioner as the one I originally purchased was for the different model engine..... but much difference in price too, went from $75 to $180. Seems like my front cam might have gone of by 1/16". Is this noticeable? Do i need to try to turn it back?
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So it's good to have a 3/8" torque wrench and 1/2"? So nervous about doing this next year. I'm at 95k now. I have changed the spark plugs. What's a good brand toque wrench that won't break the bank? Done mechanical work my whole life but have never done a timing belt or anything more in depth than that.
The torque wrench I got is from Harbor Freight and is a Quinn Digital 3/8". The impact wrench I got from the same place was the cordless 1/2" Earthquake. There is a special socket from Lisle you can get/need to take off the crankshaft bolt. When I used the tool it came out in a couple seconds. I also ordered all new bolts for tensioner and pulley. The Aisin timing kit I got came with a new water pump. I went out to day and get a lot more extensions, some with wobbles too as they are required otherwise you're pulling more stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just want to confirm that I can turn cam and crank back a hair if it jumped a little after removing timing belt. If anyone can help...
 

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The belt is removed, so turning the crank won't move the cam. And as for moving the cam slightly either direction; go for it. Won't hurt a thing. When an engine stops at key off they sometimes rotate slightly backwards depending on where the crank/cams are in compression. Use a short breaker bar or wrench, rather than a reversible ratchet so you maintain control of the cam--they can suddenly flip around 90 degrees or more by valve spring pressure on the lobes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The belt is removed, so turning the crank won't move the cam. And as for moving the cam slightly either direction; go for it. Won't hurt a thing. When an engine stops at key off they sometimes rotate slightly backwards depending on where the crank/cams are in compression. Use a short breaker bar or wrench, rather than a reversible ratchet so you maintain control of the cam--they can suddenly flip around 90 degrees or more by valve spring pressure on the lobes.
thanks I was able to get it lined back up using the breaker bar method. Everything is set perfect. I have water pump on, timing belt tensioner, tensioner pulley and idler pulley. I attempted to put belt on keeping everything very tight working from front to back. Im having a very hard time getting belt over tensioner pulley. I pulled belt back off and counted the teeth and matches old belt (197 teeth). What am I doing wrong? I havent pulled pin yet on tensioner. The belt is underneath the flanges on top and bottom of cams.
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I had the tensioner removed from the block, then installed timing belt, then tensioner (with pull pin inserted), last. Double check that the belt marks line up on crank and cams.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I had the tensioner removed from the block, then installed timing belt, then tensioner (with pull pin inserted), last. Double check that the belt marks line up on crank and cams.
Ok, I was able to find basic Honda install guide and it stated to leave idler pulley very loose until the belt is on. This gives it just enough play to allow it to slip on. I was able to finally get and pin is pulled!!!! I just ran through two full cranks and still at TDC lined up on marks.
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I am waiting for serp belt tensioner to arrive tomorrow still. The first one I ordered was from different model engine. I will definitely report back when I crank it up. thanks for help!
good morning sid where did you order the serp belt and tensioner
 
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