Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 20 of 79 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my 2012 Honda pilot touring brand new in 2011(with every available option). The car has served my family extremely well over the years and now has 160K miles on the odometer. The pilot has been generally problem free except tail gate failure (replace under warranty), misfire of 3 cylinders (repaired under recall warranty) - I install VCM Mulzzler right after the repair, and the alternator died (paid out of pocket @5K miles past warranty). Replaced some shocks, on my third battery, and normal maintenance. We travel a lot in this car - 1200 mile trip is typical every summer plus this is the family hauler to kids activities. My question is @ 160K should I be concerned going of my long road trips? Is it time to start looking for a new family hauler. Pilot still runs like the day I brought it home in 2011 -- Any high milers here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,325 Posts
Just as preventive maintenance, The one that always leaves people stranded with a Honda V6 is the oil switch(s). One on each head. Keep one in your glove box or just be proactive and replace. If you have any oily dirt buildup around the dipstick, be proactive and replace the Vtec (VVT) Solenoid Assembly. The gasket will eventually fail and leak oil into your alternator. This also replaces 1 of the 2 oil switches. If you prevent this oil leak, your alternator will last 200-250k +(mine lasted to 250k).
Other than keeping the timing belt water pump changed, You can expect the valve cover gaskets to start to leak. Keeping a good PCV valve helps, but at the first sign of oil leaking from these or oil in the spark plug tubes, replace the valve cover gaskets, grommets and spark plug tube seals.
If the engine has a rough idle with no explanation, replace the EGR valve.
Clean the MAF every 3rd or 4th oil change.
You have a nice one owner vehicle that's highly sought after, because all the new stuff isn't that great.
I'd keep it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
Also if you haven’t done a timing belt you need that ASAP. Otherwise do as NG said and consider changing the trans fluid too if you haven’t.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,325 Posts
Also if you haven’t done a timing belt you need that ASAP. Otherwise do as NG said and consider changing the trans fluid too if you haven’t.
Ooops, yep, I forgot about the regular drain and fills with VML ATF. 😁
 
  • Like
Reactions: briantii

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,325 Posts
I forgot to add timing belt and water pump were replaced at 108K miles.
Let's say you make it to 208k, to do the next timing belt water pump job, inspect the oil pan for leaks. It may be a good time to reseal the oil pump and pan. Replace the 2 cam seals and front main. By this time, you will have saved a boatload of cash to keep the vehicle going for another 100k.
 
  • Like
Reactions: briantii

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just as preventive maintenance, The one that always leaves people stranded with a Honda V6 is the oil switch(s). One on each head. Keep one in your glove box or just be proactive and replace. If you have any oily dirt buildup around the dipstick, be proactive and replace the Vtec (VVT) Solenoid Assembly. The gasket will eventually fail and leak oil into your alternator. This also replaces 1 of the 2 oil switches. If you prevent this oil leak, your alternator will last 200-250k +(mine lasted to 250k).
Other than keeping the timing belt water pump changed, You can expect the valve cover gaskets to start to leak. Keeping a good PCV valve helps, but at the first sign of oil leaking from these or oil in the spark plug tubes, replace the valve cover gaskets, grommets and spark plug tube seals.
If the engine has a rough idle with no explanation, replace the EGR valve.
Clean the MAF every 3rd or 4th oil change.
You have a nice one owner vehicle that's highly sought after, because all the new stuff isn't that great.
I'd keep it.
Thanks a lot! This is great advice - I will start working on all those maintenance items you listed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Let's say you make it to 208k, to do the next timing belt water pump job, inspect the oil pan for leaks. It may be a good time to reseal the oil pump and pan. Replace the 2 cam seals and front main. By this time, you will have saved a boatload of cash to keep the vehicle going for another 100k.
Will do, thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
sell that sh_t and buy a new pilot !
don't listen to us cheap a__ idiots
keep your fluids clean and change the brakes as needed
look out for leaks !
Haha, I know you are joking but your first two sentences sounded like my dealership sales folks - always trying to buy my 2012 Pilot.
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
I hate to be one of those obnoxious fanboys, but 160k is barely anything. As long as you keep up with basic maintenance, it will not leave you stranded.

I disagree with proactive replacement of certain stuff. Obviously, timing belt/oil/transmission fluid yes...but if your car isn't leaking oil, don't start replacing seals. I'm of the mindset, once you start fixing stuff that doesn't need fixing, you'll discover more problems/the replacement parts won't be as good and they'll fail quicker.

For what it's worth, I have one Pilot with 211k miles and it doesn't leak any oil from the oil pump or VTEC solenoid. It has a slight rear main seal seepage. You better believe I won't be spending money to fix that until it's literally gushing oil from it.

Things will break. The ignition wafers may wear out, battery, starter, etc. I don't consider that to be unreliable. If it causes you too much anguish, it may be worth it to trade into a newer car.

Despite what people would lead you to believe on here, not everyone has to keep their car 20 years. It is perfectly acceptable to get a new car every 5-10 years and it is also fine if you don't do maintenance yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
I disagree with proactive replacement of certain stuff. Obviously, timing belt/oil/transmission fluid yes...but if your car isn't leaking oil, don't start replacing seals. I'm of the mindset, once you start fixing stuff that doesn't need fixing, you'll discover more problems/the replacement parts won't be as good and they'll fail quicker.
On aircraft there have been studies showing exactly what you described. Maintenance induced failures are for sure a legit problem and in most cases you’re better off running parts to failure- yes even in aircraft as the “worn out” failure modes tend to be less severe than the maintenance induced failure modes. In other word if it’s not broke, don’t fix it until it is. That doesnt mean skipping oil changes and timing belts, but it does mean don’t swap parts just because one day they could break.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,715 Posts
I bought my 2012 Honda pilot touring brand new in 2011(with every available option). The car has served my family extremely well over the years and now has 160K miles on the odometer. We travel a lot in this car - 1200 mile trip is typical every summer plus this is the family hauler to kids activities. My question is @ 160K should I be concerned going of my long road trips? Is it time to start looking for a new family hauler.
Do you (and/or other members of your family) feel as though it's time for a new family hauler?
Have you (or they) seen any new vehicles that are appealing?
Can you afford to buy a new vehicle now?
Are your children at risk of being ostracized by their peers because they arrive at activities in a 10-year-old vehicle?
Have you considered renting a vehicle for use on your 1,200-mile summer trip?
Is your spare tire due for replacement based on age? Same for the radiator hoses?
 

·
Administrator
2016 CRV Touring AWD, 2005 Pilot RIP.
Joined
·
16,315 Posts
Your tolerance for repairs, associated costs and downtime plus cost of normal consumables will dictate how you feel about new v stay with your current ride. Current generation is getting close to replacement. Hard call to make.
I too reached a point where I didn't want to take my first gen on long rides.
I looked hard at the current gen just as it was released. I stuck with my first gen but cost of ownership rose rapidly. Its job duties became local as wife got newer ride With better long distance ability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
So much great information on here. I have a 2014 with 183,000km on it. Are there any how to videos or write ups on the following:
Vtec (VVT) Solenoid Assembly
Replacing the Oil Switches
Cleaning MAF Sensor
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,325 Posts
On aircraft there have been studies showing exactly what you described. Maintenance induced failures are for sure a legit problem and in most cases you’re better off running parts to failure- yes even in aircraft as the “worn out” failure modes tend to be less severe than the maintenance induced failure modes. In other word if it’s not broke, don’t fix it until it is. That doesnt mean skipping oil changes and timing belts, but it does mean don’t swap parts just because one day they could break.
I hate to be one of those obnoxious fanboys, but 160k is barely anything. As long as you keep up with basic maintenance, it will not leave you stranded.
I disagree with proactive replacement of certain stuff. Obviously, timing belt/oil/transmission fluid yes...but if your car isn't leaking oil, don't start replacing seals. I'm of the mindset, once you start fixing stuff that doesn't need fixing, you'll discover more problems/the replacement parts won't be as good and they'll fail quicker.
For what it's worth, I have one Pilot with 211k miles and it doesn't leak any oil from the oil pump or VTEC solenoid. It has a slight rear main seal seepage. You better believe I won't be spending money to fix that until it's literally gushing oil from it.
If you notice oily dirt around your dipstick, you want to wait until oil gushes from around the Vtec assembly, taking a chance on destroying your alternator?
When replacing your second timing belt, you shouldn't inspect your seals and oil pan and pump for leaks? When do you suppose this should be done? 30-40k miles later and your forced to not only reseal your pan and oil pump but also forced into an early 3rd Timing belt water pump job?
The OP is concerned about being stranded by a high milage Pilot. The oil pressure switch(s) and alternator are the 2 big ones that will leave you stranded, calling for a tow truck.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aggrex

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,261 Posts
With proper maintenance the Pilot should last you well over 200k. You've already had the VCM issues and disabled it. Outside of compliance bushings there is really nothing else that goes wrong on a high percentage of 2nd gens. The issue is when the perceived value is less than the maintenance costs/effort for you. I have an old Sonata that's worth a couple grand, but being FWD and a timing chain the maintenance costs are so minimal that I continue to do them. The timing belt is the big cost/effort maintenance item where a lot of people draw the line.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aggrex

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,325 Posts
Before & After​
148064

If your 150k miles + and the oil and dirt is really matting up around the dipstick, I'd be proactive and not wait until your loose an alternator.

 
1 - 20 of 79 Posts
Top