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My Pilot just reached 100K miles. I believe there is a timing belt/wate pump/s-belt service due in the next 5K miles, which will be about 6-9 months for me. My dealer wants approx. $1,200 for the service. Question is, what other major services will be due in the next 50K miles, if any? I'm weighing the cost factor of doing this service and keeping the vehicle another 5 years, or selling the Pilot now, before I spend $1.2K on this service. I've already replaced the spark plugs at 99K, but did that service myself.
 

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Firstly I recommend everyone learn how to diy. I can change the timing belt off the honda v6 in an afternoon, I usually change the pullys, water pump, front crank seal, cam seals, timing belt, adjust the valves, change serpentine belt. All for under $300 in parts.

As for your question about additional service and costs, in my experience after 100k you will basically be waiting for things to fail, alternator around 150k, same with starter. battery, suspension.

Long story short, if you are mechanically inclined, I would do the required maintence and service, timing belt change is probably the most critical job to get right (not aligning properly crank and cams can destroy the engine) and everything else that will fail afterwards can be changed easily (watch you yube and download the service manual) if not and you're going to keep paying dealership prices, its not worth it. You can still sell your pilot for 8-12k and put it towards another new car. Me however I hate paying monthly payments for a new car and enjoy driving my hondas with 300+k miles.
 

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A car that just had its timing belt done is good for another 100,000 miles. In my opinion, starter, battery, alternator, etc is cheaper than a car payment.
Also don't go to a dealer, my independent, ex-Honda mechanic does it for about $1,000 and I know he doesn't cut corners. Having a reliable and trustworthy mechanic is worth a LOT.
 

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My local dealer estimated about the same as yours, $1400 if I remember correctly, local guy wanted $1000. Dealer matched his price so I had them do it... timing belt, tensioner, water pump, etc..
 

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DIY hands down if you are handy. You need tools though: a special tool to hold the crank pulley and a long cheater bar in at least 1/2" drive.
 

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Unless things have changed since the 2005 Pilot you’re also looking at a valve adjustment. All fluids will likely need to be replaced in the next 50k miles as well.
As others have mentioned, the more work you can do on your own makes it easier to justify the cost of keeping a 100k+ mile vehicle.
 

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I'll add my two cents to the discussion. If you have the tools and the skills to do a brake job, or replace the starter or alternator, then go for the timing belt. If you're a total newbie on this work, don't start with the timing belt! If you can get help from an experienced friend, then go for it. Breaking loose the pulley bolt is a challenge, and the belt change itself requires understanding of the system and careful, accurate work.
 

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I replaced mine at 125k.
Belt was basically new - I did not notice anything on it.
Water pump started sweating but from what I could see I could have gone another 20-30k on it.
Tensioner started leaking - that is what pushed me to do timing belt at 125k. I started hearing a bit of noise every morning I started my Pilot.

Here is the process I followed:
1. $170 Aisin timing belt kit + $20 serpentine belt.
2. $400 labor - if you are located in NJ, NY I can give you reliable mechanic. He will get the job done right and even let you watch it. Obviously don’t stand next to him like an ass...le. Everything was replaced: water pump, belts, tensioner, pulleys.

I already put more than 2k on it; no sound, no issues at all.

Be careful with places that give you coupons. They might not replace everything they told you on paper while you wait in the waiting room drinking coffee.

The last time I was at dealership is to replace bushings for front control arms I believe. They told me the job would be at least 4 hours. They did not know I have camera in my truck.
It was fun to tell the manager that I know they literally spent 24 minutes working on my car; for the rest of the time it was neatly parked in their garage waiting to be lifted.
 

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My Pilot just reached 100K miles. I believe there is a timing belt/wate pump/s-belt service due in the next 5K miles, which will be about 6-9 months for me. My dealer wants approx. $1,200 for the service. Question is, what other major services will be due in the next 50K miles, if any? I'm weighing the cost factor of doing this service and keeping the vehicle another 5 years, or selling the Pilot now, before I spend $1.2K on this service. I've already replaced the spark plugs at 99K, but did that service myself.
I enthusiastically echo Alzeal's sentiments. My impetus to become a reasonably learned DIYer began with my desire to throw off the shackles of air-conditioner-breakdown-fear, and I found everything I needed to work on my own A/C systems from Youtube and Harbor Freight. As for timing belts, believe it or not, I also learned everything I needed to know about how to change my Honda timing belts - on jackstands, no lift - from Youtube videos backed up by my Haynes manual. Toughest part of the job is the crankbolt, which you can spin off like magic with a $25 specialized socket from Lisle and a $40 electric impact driver from Harbor Freight. Just watch a couple videos (I recommend Eric the Car Guy and South Main Auto's excellent videos) over and over until comfy with the finer points, find the tools you need (ETCG is especially good about laying out the tools a DIYer will need), find a solid timing belt parts kit (you want to be sure to get one with Aisin bearings and belt, plus the kits I get don't include the tensioner, so shop for a good one separately), and use bull clips to stick the belt to the sprockets in the correct position while you finish up threading the belt and tightening down the pulleys and tensioner. And make sure you give the crank a spin once all the way around manually once the new belt is on and the pin is pulled on the tensioner to make 100% sure you've got it on right before retorquing the crankbolt and buttoning it all back together. Really, it's just alot of fasteners - there's plenty of room to work from above and below, and the $$$ savings and sense of satisfaction are tremendous.
 

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I did 2 timing belt changes on my Pilot prior to trading it in this April. Between 105K and 199K when I traded it, I had to put in a battery and replace the non OEM tensioner I installed that failed and replace pads/rotors. I was also impacted by the VCM oil consumption but Honda fixed that on their dime. Do the maintenance and it should last.

To do the process yourself, depending on your mechanical ability look at 6-10hrs. There is a lot of stuff to remove to get to the timing belt and if you do the waterpump at the same time, add another hour to drain the coolant and replace the thermostat as well. If you have a really good impact wrench you may be able to spin off the crank nut. I purchased the tool and used a breaker bar along with the starter to get mine free. Other than that, normal tools, floor jack, jack stands and you are good to go. Nothing really to be scared of. The biggest thing to remember is once you get it torn down, replace everything that interfaces with that belt (pulleys, tensioner, waterpump). To do it later you will be basically doing another complete TB service and once every 105K is more than enough.
 

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I have a 2013 and have never attempted a timing belt change but I just had the dealer did it and sucked up the cost. Why? Well, it's a line I just don't cross especially when if the belt brakes (at least on our 2013) it's basically game over on the engine if you are doing it at speed. Keep in mind that the $1100 or so included the cost of belt, water pump, accessory belt plus they had to replace the coolant, so that's valuable as well.

There are many ways to save money otherwise like the spark plugs. Ordered them new from eBay, did them myself (super easy) and saved probably $300-$400 right there. When the temp drops, I'll replace the rotors and brake pads and will probably save $700+ there by using quality but generic rotors and bought online pads. Not to mention that the Pilot has enough clearance to where you can change the oil without jacking it up.

Again, that's just my opinion. It was very important to me to ensure that I have documentation of the dealer changing it using their own parts, so if it breaks anytime before the next 100k, I at least can push the dealer to try and help me out anyway they can. However, those that do it have my respect. I personally would NEVER get anyone other than a dealer to do it as then you are going to wind up paying pretty close to what you would've spent at a dealership.
 

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My local dealer estimated about the same as yours, $1400 if I remember correctly, local guy wanted $1000. Dealer matched his price so I had them do it... timing belt, tensioner, water pump, etc..
I had the timing belt on my 2012 Pilot replaced in January. It only had 47,026 miles, but was seven years old, which qualified it for a change. It cost me a total of $1,069 at my local dealer. That was with a $100 discount as my wife and I get 10% off all parts and labor at the dealership (In this case, a little under 10%.). It was the standard replacement: timing belt, water pump, outer belt and belt tensioner. With an interference engine, I don't want to take any chances with a broken timing belt. Had on break on my former 1984 Volvo and, thank goodness it did not have an interference engine.
 

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My 2005 Pilot now has 232,000 miles on it. I do most of my maintenance myself. I decided the 105K maintenance was beyond my ability and went to an independent because it was cheaper than the dealer. My vehicle has had no unexpected repairs ever, except that at 195K the timing belt broke. Ouch! I have no idea if this is somehow related to going to an independent repair shop, or if was just unlucky. It cost me $3,200 for the entire repair, though it included the $1,800 that I would have paid for the major maintenance that was coming up in another 15K miles. For me the cost was worth it. Other than more than a few dings, the vehicle runs like a top. It suits my needs perfectly. I expect to get to 300K miles, though that is purely arbitrary. If the transmission fails I'll probably think more than twice about fixing it, until then I'll probably drive it. All my repairs are much less than the cost of replacing the vehicle.
 

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My 2005 Pilot now has 232,000 miles on it. I do most of my maintenance myself. I decided the 105K maintenance was beyond my ability and went to an independent because it was cheaper than the dealer. My vehicle has had no unexpected repairs ever, except that at 195K the timing belt broke. Ouch! I have no idea if this is somehow related to going to an independent repair shop, or if was just unlucky. It cost me $3,200 for the entire repair, though it included the $1,800 that I would have paid for the major maintenance that was coming up in another 15K miles. For me the cost was worth it. Other than more than a few dings, the vehicle runs like a top. It suits my needs perfectly. I expect to get to 300K miles, though that is purely arbitrary. If the transmission fails I'll probably think more than twice about fixing it, until then I'll probably drive it. All my repairs are much less than the cost of replacing the vehicle.
Ouch that's a shame with the timing belt breaking. The Pilot I have now I bought from somebody whose timing belt broke on it as well. I spent $1200 on an engine and another $500 for parts so that's $1700 even with doing it myself. I would say $3200 is not bad. As for the transmission I was lucky mine came with a factory cooler, I also added a magnefine transmission filter for extra insurance. I had a cooler and filter on my Honda Element which currently has 330K miles and still shifts like butter. But I'm sure with regular transmission oil change yours will run a long time.
 

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I believe that Honda designs for 100k mile trouble-free life.

A dealer-serviced car will generate thousands in maintenance around then: belt/tensioner, front suspension, spare tire aging out, etc.

The dealer can take the vehicle in trade, repair this stuff inexpensively, get a good used car on the lot, and sell an upgrade to the original owner. Its a great business model.

Likewise, mechanically inclined individuals can buy one of these cars and do the work themselves for 25-40% of what the dealer would charge, depending on the parts they choose. The result will go a lot of miles, if you're lucky. I believe that's how a number of people participating here (myself included) got their Pilots.

Which approach works for you depends on how you feel about money vs. spending a few afternoons in the driveway learning to do these jobs vs. how much you just want that new-car smell.

At the very least, if you want to keep an older Pilot going and don't want to do the work yourself, find an independent mechanic. I don't think there's any way to financially justify the expense of dealer service and Honda parts for the jobs that inevitably come along after the first timing belt replacement.

If you decide not to keep it and its in good shape, I think you'll find you can do better than the dealer's trade-in offer selling it yourself, perhaps even on this forum.
 

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I believe that Honda designs for 100k mile trouble-free life.

A dealer-serviced car will generate thousands in maintenance around then: belt/tensioner, front suspension, spare tire aging out, etc.

The dealer can take the vehicle in trade, repair this stuff inexpensively, get a good used car on the lot, and sell an upgrade to the original owner. Its a great business model.

Likewise, mechanically inclined individuals can buy one of these cars and do the work themselves for 25-40% of what the dealer would charge, depending on the parts they choose. The result will go a lot of miles, if you're lucky. I believe that's how a number of people participating here (myself included) got their Pilots.

Which approach works for you depends on how you feel about money vs. spending a few afternoons in the driveway learning to do these jobs vs. how much you just want that new-car smell.

At the very least, if you want to keep an older Pilot going and don't want to do the work yourself, find an independent mechanic. I don't think there's any way to financially justify the expense of dealer service and Honda parts for the jobs that inevitably come along after the first timing belt replacement.

If you decide not to keep it and its in good shape, I think you'll find you can do better than the dealer's trade-in offer selling it yourself, perhaps even on this forum.
Amen to that, if you cant fix it yourself buy new. I was lucky my father taught me how to wrench, one of the best life skills one can be taught. I have only purchased 1 new car in my life, and that was a 2012 CRV, and it wasnt even for myself, it was for my wife. I frequently buy used with a busted engine but with a clean body and interior, engine swap and repair, and have a vehicle that actually appreciates in value. My current 2010 pilot i purchased for $2500 with a busted motor, spent another $1700 for a crashed motor and all new parts, registration, This will serve our family for another 200k miles. I just cant bring myself to drive a vehicle off the dealer lot and immediately lose 5k in value. But thats just me and my opinion.
 

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Lots of good points here in this thread. If you are mechanically inclined, don't be afraid of doing this maintenance. Buy quality parts and get a copy of the service manual for your ride and follow the steps and specifications. Document what you do, when you do it and keep your receipts. I've not run in to any issues with service on my Pilot by the dealer and voiding warranties due to it not being Honda maintained. Use the Honda Owner's site to track your maintenance as well. That way if you do trade it in, they have the documentation and it may increase what you get for your trade.

If you are not comfortable doing this, then by all means find a mechanic you trust and have them do the work.

+1 to azeal. I learned how to wrench with my dad when I was little and really enjoy doing it. I will however draw the line at rebuilding an engine, working on AC or getting in to a transmission. I do not have the tools or the time. If there is a recall then the dealer handles that. Everything else for me is fair game.
 
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