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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Update: Battery replacement did the trick, which is weird since it was replaced less than a year ago. I guess I wasn't driving as much as I thought so now I'm trying to at least start it, if not drive it, every day.
It took a couple of weeks to get around to this project and by then the battery was running about 2V and the engine wouldn't turn, click, or anything. I removed the starter for testing since that's what I originally thought was wrong but it tested fine and they replaced the battery. Put it all back together and started up just fine. Drove it back to test the alternator which was deemed fine based on a stable charge with the new battery. Been driving it for a week with no issues whatsoever. I also bought one of those plug-in voltmeter USB chargers and sitting at 12.4V with the engine off and 13.8V running. We'll see what happens.
Also, FWIW, I'm clearly not a mechanic and only ever replaced the alternator about 5 years ago. Remove and replace the starter was easy, just needed a basic ratchet set and a breaker bar.

Original: I've been searching for similar symptoms for a couple of days and thought I had identified a starter issue but these two symptoms keep throwing me off from what others have posted.

1) Barely cranks. There's definitely some sort of crank and engine turn attempt going on but very brief. When I turn the key, the engine sort of starts to turn over but it just doesn't. About 1 or 2 seconds then it just stops.
2) Battery has about 16V. I checked the batter cold and after running the lights for a couple minutes and it seems to have high voltage at 16V. There is definitely battery power though.

There was a slow start for a couple weeks prior to not starting at all. Been driving it once or twice a week and even had to replace the battery a few months ago because I didn't drive it for a while. Alternator was replaced 4 1/2 years and 40K miles ago. Timing belt, water pump, radiator and power steering pump replaced 2 years ago.

Can anyone help confirm or rule out a starter issue? I've seen a plethora of fuse, wire and relay recommendations and wouldn't know where to begin here so any specific direction in this area would be much appreciated as well.

I'm willing to get my hands dirty and replaced the alternator myself. The other work was a build up of things long overdue and I had a mechanic do it all at once as an investment in my Pilot.
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD, 2005 Pilot RIP.
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16v is clearly far in excess of any voltage normally seen. 14.5 is typically the initial voltage seen right after starting. Is that reading with engine off? it’s worryingly high. Not sure if the ecu shuts down due to excessive voltage. I would remove the battery and take it for load testing.
corrosion on leads from the battery to starter has to be considered, as should potentially other wiring damage caused by squirrels mice etc.
gas supply. I worry about old gas if usage is minimal.
It’s a start, but possibly not the cure. Take things a step at a time
 

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This could be a false reading by the batteries in your multi meter being old/low. Put in some fresh batteries and try again.
 
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I agree that 16V is excessive. Since your Pilot is not starting, the alternator isn’t actively charging the battery. With the engine off for a while I’d expect battery voltage to be 12.6V to 13.2V. If it’s not the multimeter battery as Nailgrease suggested, I’d first concentrate on what caused the battery voltage to reach 16V. The likely cause of that is a bad alternator since bad batteries tend to have lower than nominal readings. It probably makes sense to pull the alternator and get it tested. Normally you could have the alternator tested while it’s installed, but since the Pilot doesn’t start you need to remove it. And you might as well have the battery load tested at the same time.

The slow crank could be caused by the battery being bad, a failing starter, bad starter relay, or corroded wiring. Inspect the positive battery lead going to the starter, the negative battery lead between post and chassis, and the wires between engine/tranny and chassis.

It sounds like the Pilot might have multiple issues so tackle them in an ordered manner. Keep us posted what you find.
 
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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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Here are the locations of the cables and grounds to check.
 

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First check battery voltage when trying to crank. Then the quickest and simplest is to voltage drop both the power and ground side. Put one meter lead on the + post the other on the + on the starter set on voltage and have someone try to start it. Should see less then 1 volt. Do the same thing on the ground, again max 1 volt. If you see more then 1 volt, you have a high resistance issue to find. However, what you described is most likely a bad starter.
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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I've got one of these now, I miss having a battery gauge built in to the dash.


 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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In English, yes. I think for product names they just throw together a hodgepodge of as many search words that might lead someone to their wares.

But hey, at least the "V" (though in digital it looks more like a "U") for volts is displayed after the number on one of the actual products. And they do work well. And they won't break the bank.
 

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Can't speak for the Sumis as I don't own a set, but those volt meters work just fine and I'm glad to be able to just glance down to get that battery and charging info. Quicker and more convenient than deploying the multimeter.

Is that what you do, or do you have the dealership read your voltage for you for a small additional fee when you go have your oil changed there? :p

Is there anyone in Connecticut or Rhode Island who actually changes their own oil anymore? :p
 

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Can't speak for the Sumis as I don't own a set, but those volt meters work just fine and I'm glad to be able to just glance down to get that battery and charging info. Quicker and more convenient than deploying the multimeter.

Is that what you do, or do you have the dealership read your voltage for you for a small additional fee when you go have your oil changed there? :p
Did you buy the plug-in voltmeter primarily for that feature or for the USB charge points?

I've never encountered that sort of an overvoltage electrical problem with a Honda/Acura vehicle. Have you?
Were it to occur, then without floundering about I would deploy the Fluke to investigate such a fluke and try to determine the cause for that fishy situation.

My GM vehicle, in comparison, has a "driver information center" which includes a voltmeter function.
 

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Can't speak for the Sumis as I don't own a set, but those volt meters work just fine and I'm glad to be able to just glance down to get that battery and charging info. Quicker and more convenient than deploying the multimeter.
Got similar plug in volt meter/USB charger for my vehicles and it’s easy for the novice (daughter) to read the relative state of the battery/charging system. May not be as accurate as a multimeter but she understands 10.8 is bad and 14.2 is good for example.
 

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Did you buy the plug-in voltmeter primarily for that feature or for the USB charge points?

I've never encountered that sort of an overvoltage electrical problem with a Honda/Acura vehicle. Have you?
Were it to occur, then without floundering about I would deploy the Fluke to investigate such a fluke and try to determine the cause for that fishy situation.

My GM vehicle, in comparison, has a "driver information center" which includes a voltmeter function.
Both, including for the Quick Charge 3.0 and the pass-through 12-volt socket for my dashcam, thought I may hardwire that into a fusebox this summer.

Nope, can't say I've ever encountered that sort of overvoltage either. Must be a red herring.


Blazer had a voltmeter in the dash. Kinda miss that rugged beater sometimes.
 

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Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
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Got similar plug in volt meter/USB charger for my vehicles and it’s easy for the novice (daughter) to read the relative state of the battery/charging system. May not be as accurate as a multimeter but she understands 10.8 is bad and 14.2 is good for example.
Exactly why I got my daughter one, too. (y)
 
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