Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
134,500 mile 2006 ridgeline with synthetic oil went well beyond the recommended time to change the oil, like more than 1000 miles, heck maybe even 2000 miles bc the battery went dead in there and the minder miles reset. No oil on the stick at all. Yikes! Well, ok, I was asking for that.

I think the 2007 pilot with 136,500 miles had a synthetic blend and let it go 600+ miles beyond, and I looked at its dip stick. Same. Yikes!

So both got their oil changes, but I was pretty surprised to see that they are now oil burners at ~135,000 miles each. I’m guessing that to not register on the dip stick, each was more than one quart low.

Are these cars now at the point where I need to check the oil with every fill up? Or maybe I just better never go past that maintenance minder again.

Or was it the synthetic (blend) oil?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,957 Posts
In the owner's manual, Honda has always recommended checking the oil level every time you refuel.
Maybe you don't need to check it that frequently, but never checking it between oil changes is not a good practice.

Also, while the maintenance minder calculates the oil change interval, it does not monitor the oil level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
I learned recently that a certain amount of our oil evaporates. This is why Im switching all our gasoline vehicles to Shell Rotella Gas Truck oil.
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
also going 600 miles over your normal oil change interval is not a big deal. Even 1,000 isn’t. I don’t check every fuel up but I check it when I think about it. Never had to add oil which I am happy about.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Here is what Don Bowman has to say....
What Happens If There Is No Oil in Your Car Engine?
BY DON BOWMAN

There are many moving parts in an engine, all of which are in very close tolerances. These parts move at an incredible speed. The oil pump pushes oil through passages to all the moving parts. Most of the moving parts have a passage dedicated to that particular part. The oil is forced in between these parts to create a film separating the parts from each other.

Lack of oil for even two seconds is destructive to an engine. Without the oil to separate the parts, they begin to touch each other and metal-to-metal contact occurs at high speed. Without oil, an engine can destroy itself in a matter of seconds. When no oil shows on the dipstick but the oil light in the car did not come on, there is probably about at least two quarts left. If the light comes on, it means that the oil pump is not picking any oil up from the pan so there is no oil circulating, and therefore no oil pressure. Shut the key off as fast as possible no matter where you are. The car will not make it to a service station once the oil light comes on.

Within seconds, an engine will seize up. When that happens, the metal is so damaged within the engine that it can not be repaired. A new engine is the only answer. Check your car's oil on a regular basis. Start by checking the oil twice in one week if the car is driven regularly. Do this now and then every 500 miles if the car is not leaking or burning oil. If in either situation, the oil is up to normal and does not need to be filled, let the next check be at the end of the month. The time can be extended if it is determined that the engine is not burning or leaking oil. The idea is to find out how fast the engine is going through oil so that you do not run out. Changing the oil every 3,000 miles not only keeps the oil and the engine clean, but it locates any impending problems or oil leaks before they get out of control. Many manufacturers recommend a longer time between oil changes, and while the oil does not break down, it does get dirty within 3,000 miles on all cars. The most important part of servicing a car is changing the oil to make sure the oil stays clean and does not build up in the drivetrain.


Two quarts +/- of oil is not satisfactory to properly lubricate the engine. You more than likely have sustained engine damage, thus the oil consumption. It's getting past the rings into the cylinders and buying off. There are a few things you can try. A higher viscosity oil to lessen the amount of oil getting past the rings. Ring and valve job, (expensive and or time consuming) depending on who does it. Start a savings account for a couple of new/rebuilt engines.

Call it OCD if you like, but i check the oil on my 2020 Passport every time I fill it up. Old habits die hard, and since this is a good habit to get into I hope it never dies.
 

·
Administrator
2016 CRV Touring AWD, 2005 Pilot RIP.
Joined
·
16,046 Posts
Since its a quart from Min to Max and you had no oil on the dipstick, looks like you 2-3 quarts short. It probably does have some heat damage. Lets keep the level up, and drive it for some time to see what the consumption is.

Then decide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Did you ever see the oil light on or hear the engine sputter? If not, your likely ok.
 
  • Like
Reactions: plplplpl

·
Super Moderator
2020 Honda Passport Touring AWD Metallic Steel
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Since its a quart from Min to Max and you had no oil on the dipstick, looks like you 2-3 quarts short. It probably does have some heat damage. Lets keep the level up, and drive it for some time to see what the consumption is.

Then decide.
Heat damage as in something like this???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
Which Don Bowman? This Don Bowman?

It's got to be the one on the left. He's got the wrist brace on for the carpal tunnel syndrome, from typing on the puter so much. :p
 
  • Like
Reactions: plplplpl

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot EX-L 2013 Honda Pilot EX-L
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
I'm embarrassed to admit that I ran my 1996 Accord on about 1.5 quarts of oil for a verrrryy long time. The dang thing leaked so much oil it was ridiculous. It wasn't that I never checked it. Once those leaks were fixed it burned a little bit of oil but nothing crazy for a Honda that old. Don't follow my example.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Did you ever see the oil light on or hear the engine sputter? If not, your likely ok.
I'd run 5w30 oil if your not in the frozen tundra.
No. They don’t run quite as smooth as when they were new, but generally no issues.

So it’s time to end the 5w20 despite that being the recommended oil right on the filler cap??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I learned recently that a certain amount of our oil evaporates. This is why Im switching all our gasoline vehicles to Shell Rotella Gas Truck oil.
I use rotella in all my (non roller cam) 1960s-1980s Mercedes and am familiar with the benefits of the zinc for those cars. Perhaps the evaporation is just the issue, and maybe more an issue due to the switch to synthetic.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,507 Posts
I use rotella in all my (non roller cam) 1960s-1980s Mercedes and am familiar with the benefits of the zinc for those cars. Perhaps the evaporation is just the issue, and maybe more an issue due to the switch to synthetic.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
A switch to synthetic can be a problem. More so for different oil brands. A switch to 5w30 will help + Shell Rotella Gas Truck oil. If you have a 2wd.., disable the VCM. Have you checked the VVT solenoid gasket(s) for leaks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A switch to synthetic can be a problem. More so for different oil brands. A switch to 5w30 will help + Shell Rotella Gas Truck oil. If you have a 2wd.., disable the VCM. Have you checked the VVT solenoid gasket(s) for leaks?
I have not checked either vehicle for any leaks, but I also haven’t noticed any at all. Both are all wheel drive (both the 2007 pilot and the 2006 ridgeline).

Thanks for the tip to look at the VVT solenoid gasket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,957 Posts
So it’s time to end the 5w20 despite that being the recommended oil right on the filler cap??
Perhaps the evaporation is just the issue, and maybe more an issue due to the switch to synthetic.
Rather than changing oil viscosity, perhaps you should consider trying one of the high-mileage formula motor oils.
High-mileage oils are available in conventional, synthetic-blend and full-synthetic varieties, to accommodate whichever type you might prefer to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
I would check the PCV valve. Then I would try to get a better idea of how much oil it is using. Your not gonna know if you are making it better unless you have some exact numbers on how much it’s using. You don’t need to check it every fillup but something like once a week or once a month depending on how much you drive. Just write down the mileage when you check it. I have found that some engines will use more oil if full than if they are between add and full. So I would wait until it gets to the add line before adding any - unless you are going on a long trip.

My 04 started using a little oil and I switch to high mileage oil and after a couple of oil changes it stopped. That would be my next step after you know how much it is using. Then see if it helps.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top