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You can get some high temp RTV Silicon to add on when you put it back inside the oven for the butyl to soften then push the lens back in then add extra RTV Silicon, or you can buy some Butyl from TRS and order some Switchback LED while you at it. :)

  • regular RTV or high temp RTV? What's the main difference? (just seems like an oxymoron, since "high temp RTV" = high temp Room Temperature Vulcanizing :wink:)
  • silicon or silicone? :smile:
 

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OK, so I decided to go all Betty Crocker on this and bake my test taillight assembly in the oven to separate it. Here's my recipe:

Six to ten minutes at 200 degrees (preheated) was not nearly enough, and when I tried to pry it apart first with a putty knife, then with a box cutter (Exacto blade), all I succeeded in doing was crack the plastic a bit. :frown:


  1. Preheat the oven to 230 degrees.
  2. Place the taillight assembly on a cookie sheet and bake for a good 20 to 30 minutes.
  3. Remove from oven and gently pry apart with putty knife. You'll feel where to insert it between the two halves where it's become soft enough. If not, bake it some more.
  4. Remove lens and serve (yourself) with a frosty domestic beer. :7:



Now, it's all well and fine to get it apart, but the crux of the matter is resealing it properly. I let it cool down (it can be too hot to the touch to manipulate otherwise), and applied a constant bead of clear RTV silicone around the perimeter of the assembly, where it had been previously joined. In my case, I had to add a tad more where I had chipped away a few little shards in attempting to pry it open before it was fully warmed up. :crying: I'm letting it set overnight, even if that might be overkill with RTV silicone. However, the preliminary result looks kind of OK, and I'll be off to Canadian Tire over the course of the next few days to pick up a couple of single filament amber bulbs. I'll install the test assembly in lieu of the current one and ride around for a few weeks in rain or shine to check for leaks or condensation. If anyone else tries this, post your results, too.


 

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OK, so I decided to go all Betty Crocker on this and bake my test taillight assembly in the oven to separate it. Here's my recipe:

Six to ten minutes at 200 degrees (preheated) was not nearly enough, and when I tried to pry it apart first with a putty knife, then with a box cutter (Exacto blade), all I succeeded in doing was crack the plastic a bit. <img src="http://www.piloteers.org/forums/images/Piloteers_org_2015/smilies/tango_face_sad.png" border="0" alt="" title="Frown" class="inlineimg" />


  1. Preheat the oven to 230 degrees.
  2. Place the taillight assembly on a cookie sheet and bake for a good 20 to 30 minutes.
  3. Remove from oven and gently pry apart with putty knife. You'll feel where to insert it between the two halves where it's become soft enough. If not, bake it some more.
  4. Remove lens and serve (yourself) with a frosty domestic beer. <img src="http://www.piloteers.org/forums/images/smilies/cheers.gif" border="0" alt="" title="" class="inlineimg" />



Now, it's all well and fine to get it apart, but the crux of the matter is resealing it properly. I let it cool down (it can be too hot to the touch to manipulate otherwise), and applied a constant bead of clear RTV silicone around the perimeter of the assembly, where it had been previously joined. In my case, I had to add a tad more where I had chipped away a few little shards in attempting to pry it open before it was fully warmed up. <img src="http://www.piloteers.org/forums/images/Piloteers_org_2015/smilies/tango_face_crying.png" border="0" alt="" title="Crying" class="inlineimg" /> I'm letting it set overnight, even if that might be overkill with RTV silicone. However, the preliminary result looks kind of OK, and I'll be off to Canadian Tire over the course of the next few days to pick up a couple of single filament amber bulbs. I'll install the test assembly in lieu of the current one and ride around for a few weeks in rain or shine to check for leaks or condensation. If anyone else tries this, post your results, too.



awesome. if it works out for you i might try this for mine
 

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Here are a couple of pictures and I also made a couple of crude animated GIFs to show the preliminary results installed. After all, we do want to see it in action, don't we? The first one is from a couple of photos juxtaposed, and the second if from a short video. A ride out in a good downpour today has yielded no condensation or leaking as of yet, but I'd say it's too early to tell and I'll continue for a couple of weeks to be surer.











 

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So I did the right side today and it went fine: preheat oven to 230 degrees and bake for almost a half hour, gently pry apart the two halves of the assembly, pop out the top red lens with a long screwdriver through the bulb hole, and then reassemble with clear RTV silicone. Wait a couple of hours, then reinstall assembly, substituting a single filament amber bulb on top for the turn signal.

One caveat, however: The technique worked fine on my OEM taillight assemblies, wherein I assume proper silicone/butyl was used as a bonding agent, but when I tried it with the "economy" aftermarket assembly I had ordered a couple of years ago from RockAuto (Eagle Eyes branded part no. HO2800162V made in Taiwan) to replace my left OEM assembly that had a hairline crack in it, it became apparent that they just used superglue or something, since the heating process did not soften it up to make it separable like the OEM assemblies. Very gradually increasing the oven temperature and baking time did little more than eventually start melting the entire assembly itself, and any amount of prying apart only succeeded in eventually cracking it. It was a perfectly fine replacement if for the original assembly otherwise, and I had had it for a couple of years, but now it's a slightly melted, partially cracked oddity currently awaiting garbage day.

Yay, now both sides are amber, not like the past week or so when I was driving around with taillights looking like those huskies that have two different color eyes. Now both turn signals are a distinctive powerfully pulsating amber instead of a gently glowing red lost among all the other red lights back there. Consider this my contribution on behalf of Piloteers and other decent drivers everywhere toward raising awareness of the concept of a courteous zipper merge among douchebag Bimmer and Range Rover drivers. The brighter amber flashing educates them that, "Hey, I'm :cursin: MERGING here!"
 

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Another little thing to note: the single filament amber bulbs have tiny nubs on where the connectors go into the sockets, presumably to make them idiot-proof for where a dual filament bulb is called for, so you have to push the bulbs hard into the sockets, since the little nubs are designed to block them from being inserted, normally, and they still don't feel like they go in properly all the way.

Driving around the shamefully poorly maintained streets of this city constantly rumbles and jostles you to the point of loosening the fillings in your teeth. The inevitable occurred and a hyper-flashing of my right turn signal, which usually indicates a burned out bulb, alerted me to what I suspected: the bulb had been rattled loose and fallen into the assembly.

No problemo; I just removed the two bolts that hold the assembly in place, unscrewed the bulb sockets out by hand, and tilted the assembly to let the bulb fall out. I then rubbed the tiny nubs down on a file, and the bulbs then reinserted perfectly as if they had been meant to go there all along. Therefore, I would recommend doing that in the first place.
 

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After 2 years, no condensation , right ?

Those streets haven't "rattled" your bulbs loose again ?

I was searching thru google to find a way to purchase the "Russian lights" for 2008 Pilot EX-L , but gave up
I might go the route you took in this thread and "mod" my lights myself.

Bravo brave sir
(y)
 

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*seems some JDMASTER rear turn signal LEDs available in amber (?), bright enough to show "amber" without removing the RED lens on the stock light compartment.

At 15:24 shows lights flashing

The Youtuber failed to go into details about the item, he did mention "PX" bulbs.
He also failed to demonstrate the changes at night time.
 

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Hmmm, interesting. I, also, would be curious to see more of how it works under various lighting conditions, etc. Interesting video, but a little too short for conclusive results. But it might be good and worth a try.
 

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I believe this is the bulb


PX SMD 3057 3157 4057 4157 LED Bulbs | Set of 2
Availability: In Stock $19.99
  • Fits 3156 3056 3356 3456 4156 3047 3157 3157A 3057 3155 3157NA 3357 3457 3457A 4057 4114 4157 4157NA,etc
  • Used for Brake Tail Lights, Back Up Reverse Light, Turn signal Lights, Side Marker lights, Daytime Running Lights(DRL), etc.
  • Optional colors: 6000K xenon white/Amber Yellow/Pure Red

  • Note: 1. You may need to install the load resistor to avoid the turn signal hyper flash

    3157 50W 6Ohm LED Load Resistors | Set of 2
    Availability: In Stock $24.99


 

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OK, so I decided to go all Betty Crocker on this and bake my test taillight assembly in the oven to separate it. Here's my recipe:

Six to ten minutes at 200 degrees (preheated) was not nearly enough, and when I tried to pry it apart first with a putty knife, then with a box cutter (Exacto blade), all I succeeded in doing was crack the plastic a bit. :frown:


  1. Preheat the oven to 230 degrees.
  2. Place the taillight assembly on a cookie sheet and bake for a good 20 to 30 minutes.
  3. Remove from oven and gently pry apart with putty knife. You'll feel where to insert it between the two halves where it's become soft enough. If not, bake it some more.
  4. Remove lens and serve (yourself) with a frosty domestic beer. :7:



Now, it's all well and fine to get it apart, but the crux of the matter is resealing it properly. I let it cool down (it can be too hot to the touch to manipulate otherwise), and applied a constant bead of clear RTV silicone around the perimeter of the assembly, where it had been previously joined. In my case, I had to add a tad more where I had chipped away a few little shards in attempting to pry it open before it was fully warmed up. :crying: I'm letting it set overnight, even if that might be overkill with RTV silicone. However, the preliminary result looks kind of OK, and I'll be off to Canadian Tire over the course of the next few days to pick up a couple of single filament amber bulbs. I'll install the test assembly in lieu of the current one and ride around for a few weeks in rain or shine to check for leaks or condensation. If anyone else tries this, post your results, too.


Do you still have the red lens? Can you measure them?
 

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As a matter of fact I still do. My wife says I keep too much useless stuff in the garage, and TBH she's probably right. I don't know what I was expecting to ever use them for again. But anyway, I just measured them and they are exactly 4 inches in diameter. Is that the measurement you were looking for?
 

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plplplpl, did you use an amber bulb, or one that looks silver and then lights up amber? I had those for my front blinkers, I think factory and would probably go that route. If I can get the motor swapped and car finished.
 

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Here are a couple of pictures and I also made a couple of crude animated GIFs to show the preliminary results installed. After all, we do want to see it in action, don't we? The first one is from a couple of photos juxtaposed, and the second if from a short video. A ride out in a good downpour today has yielded no condensation or leaking as of yet, but I'd say it's too early to tell and I'll continue for a couple of weeks to be surer.



Looks good, only downside to this method is you lose the benefit of the fresnel lens which helps with visibility when someone is directly behind you from farther away. If you have or know someone with access to a SLA printer, could make your own clear lens. :geek:

EDIT: Also, what happens if you use your brakes? Do those light up as RED or AMBER?
 

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plplplpl, did you use an amber bulb, or one that looks silver and then lights up amber? I had those for my front blinkers, I think factory and would probably go that route. If I can get the motor swapped and car finished.
Amber bulbs.

Looks good, only downside to this method is you lose the benefit of the fresnel lens which helps with visibility when someone is directly behind you from farther away. If you have or know someone with access to a SLA printer, could make your own clear lens. :geek:

EDIT: Also, what happens if you use your brakes? Do those light up as RED or AMBER?
Thanks for the kind offer. :) Those turn signals light up plenty bright without the lens and seem to benefit from the silver/chrome housing to be saliently visible from any angle or distance, certainly more than the soft, warm, glowing stock red turn signals.

Brakes light up red, of course.
 
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