Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums banner
1 - 20 of 78 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 2005 Pilot EX 115,000 sun belt, just installed timing belt kit, water pump, tensioner and new coolant. Besides normal oil changes, previous owner hasn’t done anything to it. I plan on changing the spark plugs soon.

1. If the transmission shifts great and no record of fluid change, should I still do it?
2. Change the diff fluid, but doubt they have ever needed full 4WD/AWD going up and down a frontage road in the low-country.

I just read the complete PDF list of green yellow red items.

do you have any other recommendations of immediate maintenace I should do that you all recommend?

Thanks,
Just joined 4/3/2021
 

·
Registered
2008 Honda Pilot
Joined
·
99 Posts
I just bought a 2005 Pilot EX 115,000 sun belt, just installed timing belt kit, water pump, tensioner and new coolant. Besides normal oil changes, previous owner hasn’t done anything to it. I plan on changing the spark plugs soon.

1. If the transmission shifts great and no record of fluid change, should I still do it?
2. Change the diff fluid, but doubt they have ever needed full 4WD/AWD going up and down a frontage road in the low-country.

I just read the complete PDF list of green yellow red items.

do you have any other recommendations of immediate maintenace I should do that you all recommend?

Thanks,
Just joined 4/3/2021
Change the fluids just use Honda products I changed mine at 117,000 and the previous owner did nothing and it’s functioning fine I got 130,000 on the clock now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,188 Posts
I just bought a 2005 Pilot EX 115,000 sun belt, just installed timing belt kit, water pump, tensioner and new coolant. Besides normal oil changes, previous owner hasn’t done anything to it.

1. If the transmission shifts great and no record of fluid change, should I still do it?
2. Change the diff fluid, but doubt they have ever needed full 4WD/AWD going up and down a frontage road in the low-country.

do you have any other recommendations of immediate maintenace I should do that you all recommend?
1. Do a drain and refill of the transmission fluid. One drain and refill changes about one-third of the fluid.
2. The AWD system sends power to the rear wheels anytime you accelerate, so it's always been in use.
Therefore, change the fluid.
3. Change the brake fluid - it's supposed to be done every three years.
4. If the radiator is original, consider replacing it. The radiator was a known weak point on the 2005 Pilots.
Radiator failure could allow coolant and transmission fluid to mix, potentially ruining the transmission.
5. Check/replace the pollen/cabin air filter.
 

·
Registered
Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
Joined
·
10,850 Posts
Valvoline Maxlife ATF for the transmission, preferably a 3x drain & fill with a little driving between each.

Honda OEM VTM-4 Fluid (only) for the VTM-4 unit (aka rear "differential").
You may not realize it, but it's been used regularly all this time.

147336
 

·
Registered
Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
Joined
·
10,850 Posts
Beat me to it. :) What @xGS said.

More fluid fun here:

DIY: 1999-2013 Every Honda every fluid

Lovely and informative list. Almost as colorful as mine. :D

  • Rear differential: VTM-4
  • Front transfer case (post 2005): SAE 90 or SAE 80W-90 viscosity hypoid gear oil, API service classified GL4 or GL5
  • Power steering fluid: a trip to the dealer
    139241
  • Brake fluid. DOT 3 or DOT 4 (usually)
    139240
  • Antifreeze/coolant: blue (or green) concentrate (or pre-mixed)
    139236


  • Motor oil: Mobil 1 or Shell Rotella
    139237
  • Windshield washer fluid: -45°
    139243
  • Transmission: full synthetic Maxlife ATF
    139244

139238
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
do you have any other recommendations of immediate maintenace I should do that you all recommend?
You've already got a good start, and good advice here.

If it's in good shape, with such low mileage I recommend that you get it back to as close to "like new" as you can.

Once you've finished with the fluids, the front suspension is a good next step. If you own it for the long-haul, you'll replace all that stuff eventually. You might as well put it in now and enjoy it for as long as possible.

Be sure to pull the manifold cover when you do the plugs. The EGR design they used is prone to clogging. It's pretty easy to clean it up (along with the EGR & PCV), and will make a big difference in fuel economy and driving smoothness.

Oh. And put in a full-size spare. If the original mini is still in there, you don't want to risk driving on it.
 

·
Registered
Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
Joined
·
10,850 Posts
The EGR design they used is prone to clogging. It's pretty easy to clean it up (along with the EGR & PCV), and will make a big difference in fuel economy and driving smoothness.
OP, it seems you DIY, so here's a video for the EGR ports as mentioned by @Tacoma'03Pilot.

 

·
Registered
Nobili spiritus embiggens pequeño sparus tyre.
Joined
·
10,850 Posts
I just read the complete PDF list of green yellow red items.
So you've presumably also read all the great info in the Sticky, which includes this (and more).

Red: Missed recall services. There have been multiple recalls, most notably for air-bag inflators. If these were skipped, what else was? Run the VIN to see if the vehicle is current, especially for the airbags. See Recall Information for Safety & Defects | Honda Owners Site.
 

·
Registered
2008 Piot SE FWD, 2015 Pilot LX 4WD. 2005 GSX-R1000
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
OP, it seems you DIY, so here's a video for the EGR ports as mentioned by @Tacoma'03Pilot.

OK, I'll be gentle here- That was NOT corrosion! And, those were NOT the intake manifold ports! Yes, they were the EGR ports.
What did he do about the gasket? Re use it?

It's hilarious- OK, I guess I'm jealous- he can make a video- get enough watches he makes money- when he's spewing total BS about the names of things like carbon/blow by build up and calling it corrosion? And calling the EGR ports the intake manifold ports? No correction, no disclaimer. If this was your video- not trying to be rude, but c'mon man.

Some of the YouTubes I see are so FOS, and people watch them! Hey, I just watched this one didn't I? LOL
 
  • Like
Reactions: CPTDaniel

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You've already got a good start, and good advice here.

If it's in good shape, with such low mileage I recommend that you get it back to as close to "like new" as you can.

Once you've finished with the fluids, the front suspension is a good next step. If you own it for the long-haul, you'll replace all that stuff eventually. You might as well put it in now and enjoy it for as long as possible.

Be sure to pull the manifold cover when you do the plugs. The EGR design they used is prone to clogging. It's pretty easy to clean it up (along with the EGR & PCV), and will make a big difference in fuel economy and driving smoothness.

Oh. And put in a full-size spare. If the original mini is still in there, you don't want to risk driving on it.
Thank you all for the advice.
 

·
Registered
Banned from wife’s 2005 Pilot LX
Joined
·
4,360 Posts
Welcome to the forum. You received great advice above. Some other things you might consider are check the front & passenger side motor mounts as those seem to wear out quite regularly on the 2005 Pilot. Additionally check the compliance bushing on the lower control arm since those are a common failure point.

At 105k miles your Pilot was due for a valve adjustment. Some have gone well beyond that mileage; the risk is the exhaust valves tend to tighten up over time which could lead to issues.

When you replaced the timing belt was the serpentine belt also replaced?

And if the power steering fluid is black you might consider exchanging that out as well. Using the turkey baster or syringe methods works well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ConrodM

·
Registered
Glorificatus Oleum Mutante
Joined
·
12,308 Posts
OK, I'll be gentle here- That was NOT corrosion! And, those were NOT the intake manifold ports! Yes, they were the EGR ports.
What did he do about the gasket? Re use it?

It's hilarious- OK, I guess I'm jealous- he can make a video- get enough watches he makes money- when he's spewing total BS about the names of things like carbon/blow by build up and calling it corrosion? And calling the EGR ports the intake manifold ports? No correction, no disclaimer. If this was your video- not trying to be rude, but c'mon man.

Some of the YouTubes I see are so FOS, and people watch them! Hey, I just watched this one didn't I? LOL
If you can get past his use of words, he gives a good demonstration of what needs to be done. 👌
 
  • Like
Reactions: CPTDaniel

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Welcome to the forum. You received great advice above. Some other things you might consider are check the front & passenger side motor mounts as those seem to wear out quite regularly on the 2005 Pilot. Additionally check the compliance bushing on the lower control arm since those are a common failure point.

At 105k miles your Pilot was due for a valve adjustment. Some have gone well beyond that mileage; the risk is the exhaust valves tend to tighten up over time which could lead to issues.

When you replaced the timing belt was the serpentine belt also replaced?

And if the power steering fluid is black you might consider exchanging that out as well. Using the turkey baster or syringe methods works well.
I took it to Firestone, I asked them to do it while they were doing the timing belt kit, and they didn’t. We did replace the upper and lower tie rods on both sides in order to complete the alignment and I think they did the control arm while in there. With the power steering fluid, can you just suck it out and add fresh or should you turn it back and forth to her every bit out?

to recap I need to:
1. Serp belt
2. Power steering fluid
3. Diff fluid
4. Transmission fluid,
5. Spark plugs
6. Valve adjustment
7. Brake fluid
8. Maybe radiator ( how could I inspect this for fluid interaction with transmission failure)
9. Valve adjustment
10. Inspect mounts
 

·
Registered
Glorificatus Oleum Mutante
Joined
·
12,308 Posts
Valvoline Maxlife ATF for the transmission, preferably a 3x drain & fill with a little driving between each.

Honda OEM VTM-4 Fluid (only) for the VTM-4 unit (aka rear "differential").
I 2nd this.
It would be imperative to check the condition of the ATF. Is it clean, red/pink or dirty brown?
I would avoid putting Honda DW-1 in this aged transmission. Full Synthetic Valvoline MaxLife ATF will give it the best chance to perform trouble free.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TNPilot2005EX

·
Registered
Glorificatus Oleum Mutante
Joined
·
12,308 Posts
I took it to Firestone, I asked them to do it while they were doing the timing belt kit, and they didn’t. We did replace the upper and lower tie rods on both sides in order to complete the alignment and I think they did the control arm while in there. With the power steering fluid, can you just suck it out and add fresh or should you turn it back and forth to her every bit out?

to recap I need to:
1. Serp belt
2. Power steering fluid
3. Diff fluid
4. Transmission fluid,
5. Spark plugs
6. Valve adjustment
7. Brake fluid
8. Maybe radiator ( how could I inspect this for fluid interaction with transmission failure)
9. Valve adjustment
10. Inspect mounts
I'd find a trusted independent shop/mechanic to do these services.
The 2005 radiator is known to be defective. I wouldn't 2nd guess it. Just replace.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aggrex and ConrodM

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Also, check the VIN to make sure all of the recalls have been completed.
Recall Information for Safety & Defects | Honda Owners Site
Good on recalls. It was my moms car and she at least did that before I bought it from her. She bought it in 2007 with 20k miles from Honda and babied it. Doubt she ever floored it. I have noticed that it always downshifted from 2nd to 1st gear when you slow down, maybe that’s how it is programmed. I know cars downshift, but you do notice this transmission downshifts at low speeds, and make sure you give it too much gas because it will throw you back before going back into 2nd. I had a 2010 accord ex-L v6 and it was a sweet car. Had to get a bigger car for family traded in the accord for 2017 pathfinder. Horrid CVT. Keeping pathfinder but probably going to drive the pilot to save cvt transmission.
 

·
Registered
Banned from wife’s 2005 Pilot LX
Joined
·
4,360 Posts
For the power steering fluid exchange I:
1) Suck old fluid out of the reservoir (don’t go below the level of the lower port)
2) Refill to max line with Honda PS fluid
3) Drive around for a bit making sure the steering wheel gets turn to both locks a few times. For me I serpentine down my street curb to curb. Just don’t hold the steering wheel at max lock for more than a couple seconds or you risk running the pump dry.
4) Repeat above steps 3 more times. The fluid you suck out of the reservoir should get noticeably lighter in brown color each time. Perform additional cycles if the fluid still looks dark brown.

Each iteration takes about 2/3 bottle of Honda PS fluid.
 

·
Registered
Banned from wife’s 2005 Pilot LX
Joined
·
4,360 Posts
Flooring the car, in a safe manner/location, every once in a while is not a bad thing. It helps to remove carbon deposits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I 2nd this.
It would be imperative to check the condition of the ATF. Is it clean, red/pink or dirty brown?
I would avoid putting Honda DW-1 in this aged transmission. Full Synthetic Valvoline MaxLife ATF will give it the best chance to perform trouble free.
I'm picking it up in 2 weeks and driving it up to TN. I'll inspect prior to my 500 mile journey back home.
 
1 - 20 of 78 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top