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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Many years back, @ceraboy created a great write-up for changing out the transmission filter for the 2005 Pilot. Unfortunately, many of the photos from that thread were lost. The wording he used to describe the job was spot on. I'm only adding some photos as well as a tidbit here or there to describe any deviations I used from his procedure.

Note that this is only applicable to the 2005 Pilot. The 2003 and 2004 Pilot have an external inline filter. The transmission filter on the 2006 and newer Pilots is only serviceable when the transmission is separated from the engine.

This is the link to @ceraboy's post.
See posts 584 through 587


These are the parts that I ordered. The filter and crush washers are musts. The two gaskets and the spring could probably have been reused, but for the $12 additional they cost I just replaced them while I was in there. If you're doing a tranny drain and fill at the same time you'll also need four quarts of your favorite Honda compatible ATF.
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I removed the battery and the battery tray (photo still shows the battery tray). The orange straw points to the tranny filter housing. I used a ratcheting wrench (10mm and 17 mm I believe) to remove the three bolts on the tranny filter housing cover and the bolt in the middle of the housing. Ceraboy mentioned removing the air intake as well as another bolt on the tranny fluid line going to the filter housing but I didn't find either of those necessary. I didn't want to risk tearing/cracking the 16 year old air intake unless it was absolutely necessary to gain better access.
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Before removing the 17mm bolt and the tranny filter housing, I drained the transmission (~4 quarts comes out). Not too much fluid leaked out when the 17mm bolt was removed, but there was still tranny fluid in the housing when I pulled the housing cover off. I wish had placed more rags on the front side of the transmission . . . I was thinking the spillage was going to go towards the rear of the transmission but I was incorrect.
147537


This photo shows where you'd want to put the rags to catch the fluid as it drains out of the filter housing. Note the line/mark on the top center of the filter housing. There is a similar line/mark on the filter housing cover. They line up when reinstalling the cover. There was a small puddle under the Pilot once the bleeding stopped. You can avoid this with proper rag placement. The Pilot was parked on level ground during the procedure.
147539


This is the old tranny filter after 121K miles. I thought it would be in way worse shape and that there would be lots of particles caught in it. This Pilot's transmission receives a 1x drain and fill with DW-1 once every 15k miles.
147543


The trickiest part of the job, besides limited space, was getting the filter to line up with the filter housing. The filter, when inserted into the housing slants down at a ~10 degree angle where ideally it would be level with the ground (and the filter cover prior to installation). Ceraboy used a paperclip to line up the groove on the inside of the filter housing cover with the gasket on the filter. I didn't have any luck with this, so stuck a piece of fairly rigid tubing through the center hole of the filter cover and into the filter to get things to line up. You cannot see what you are doing and at some point you have to make the decision that the two are lined up. My judgement call was there was about an 1/8" gap between the front face to the filter housing and the filter cover when the filter gasket didn't go into the groove, but that gap dropped in half or more when I think the filter and cover lined up properly. That's what I went with and at that point I installed the three 10mm bolts followed by the 17mm bolt (using two new crush washers - one on each side of the banjo fitting).

The dealer I purchased the parts from provided the torque specs for the 17mm bolt and the 10mm bolt:
17mm tranny filter cover center bolt: 21 ft-lb
10mm tranny cover outer bolts: 8.7 ft-lb
With that said, good luck getting a torque wrench to fit in there. You're going to have to go by feel. I figured worst case the battery will need to be removed again to gain access to the four bolts to retighten them if necessary to correct a leak. That beats over tightening and snapping one of them off on the initial try.

My son helped me out with this job and I let him do the tasks he was capable of performing. It was good father son bonding time. It took us about three hours to complete the job. If I had done it solo it would have taken half the time, but been much less enjoyable.

I hope this helps out anyone who has a 2005 Pilot.
 

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Banned from wife’s 2005 Pilot LX
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
@ConrodM
I hope this helps you out on your 2005 Pilot. My son and I just completed the job this afternoon.
 

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2005 Pilot EXL- 227,700 Miles
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Many years back, @ceraboy created a great write-up for changing out the transmission filter for the 2005 Pilot. Unfortunately, many of the photos from that thread were lost. The wording he used to describe the job was spot on. I'm only adding some photos as well as a tidbit here or there to describe any deviations I used from his procedure.

Note that this is only applicable to the 2005 Pilot. The 2003 and 2004 Pilot have an external inline filter. The transmission filter on the 2006 and newer Pilots is only serviceable when the transmission is separated from the engine.

This is the link to @ceraboy's post.
See posts 584 through 587


These are the parts that I ordered. The filter and crush washers are musts. The two gaskets and the spring could probably have been reused, but for the $12 additional they cost I just replaced them while I was in there. If you're doing a tranny drain and fill at the same time you'll also need four quarts of your favorite Honda compatible ATF.
View attachment 147531


I removed the battery and the battery tray (photo still shows the battery tray). The orange straw points to the tranny filter housing. I used a ratcheting wrench (10mm and 17 mm I believe) to remove the three bolts on the tranny filter housing cover and the bolt in the middle of the housing. Ceraboy mentioned removing the air intake as well as another bolt on the tranny fluid line going to the filter housing but I didn't find either of those necessary. I didn't want to risk tearing/cracking the 16 year old air intake unless it was absolutely necessary to gain better access.
View attachment 147532


Before removing the 17mm bolt and the tranny filter housing, I drained the transmission (~4 quarts comes out). Not too much fluid leaked out when the 17mm bolt was removed, but there was still tranny fluid in the housing when I pulled the housing cover off. I wish had placed more rags on the front side of the transmission . . . I was thinking the spillage was going to go towards the rear of the transmission but I was incorrect.
View attachment 147537

This photo shows where you'd want to put the rags to catch the fluid as it drains out of the filter housing. Note the line/mark on the top center of the filter housing. There is a similar line/mark on the filter housing cover. They line up when reinstalling the cover. There was a small puddle under the Pilot once the bleeding stopped. You can avoid this with proper rag placement. The Pilot was parked on level ground during the procedure.
View attachment 147539

This is the old tranny filter after 121K miles. I thought it would be in way worse shape and that there would be lots of particles caught in it. This Pilot's transmission receives a 1x drain and fill with DW-1 once every 15k miles.
View attachment 147543

The trickiest part of the job, besides limited space, was getting the filter to line up with the filter housing. The filter, when inserted into the housing slants down at a ~10 degree angle where ideally it would be level with the ground (and the filter cover prior to installation). Ceraboy used a paperclip to line up the groove on the inside of the filter housing cover with the gasket on the filter. I didn't have any luck with this, so stuck a piece of fairly rigid tubing through the center hole of the filter cover and into the filter to get things to line up. You cannot see what you are doing and at some point you have to make the decision that the two are lined up. My judgement call was there was about an 1/8" gap between the front face to the filter housing and the filter cover when the filter gasket didn't go into the groove, but that gap dropped in half or more when I think the filter and cover lined up properly. That's what I went with and at that point I installed the three 10mm bolts followed by the 17mm bolt (using two new crush washers - one on each side of the banjo fitting).

The dealer I purchased the parts from provided the torque specs for the 17mm bolt and the 10mm bolt:
17mm tranny filter cover center bolt: 21 ft-lb
10mm tranny cover outer bolts: 8.7 ft-lb
With that said, good luck getting a torque wrench to fit in there. You're going to have to go by feel. I figured worst case the battery will need to be removed again to gain access to the four bolts to retighten them if necessary to correct a leak. That beats over tightening and snapping one of them off on the initial try.

My son helped me out with this job and I let him do the tasks he was capable of performing. It was good father son bonding time. It took us about three hours to complete the job. If I had done it solo it would have taken half the time, but been much less enjoyable.

I hope this helps out anyone who has a 2005 Pilot.
HERO!!!! Thank You soooo much!! I am gaining confidence now that I have this information 😁👍👍. Actually looking forward to it now. Summer is practically here in Florida (90 degrees yesterday) and need to get this done to move on to ac compressor! Of course I will share my experiences on this Awesome Forum and we will be able to see what 225k miles on filter looks like! Y’all (use guys for some 😉) are the Tops!!
 

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Nice DIY walkthrough! I'm jelly. 😐
Just crazy to me how Honda changed where the ATF filter is, leaving 1 year model unique from all the rest. Then in all their infinite wisdom, decided to put where you can never change it for the next 10 year models. 😤
 

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This needs to be a sticky. I've yet to do this on my '05 but I've had to remove the battery tray several times and the last time I did a pseudo practice run to see what I would be dealing with if I ever decided to tackle the job. Amazingly, I was surprised I had as much access to all of those bolts and that was without removing the battery bracket mount which is bolted to the frame. Of course, I wasn't dealing with the guts of the job which is installing the new filter in a cramped space. Thanks again for the informative tutorial...much appreciated!
 

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Nice DIY walkthrough! I'm jelly. 😐
Just crazy to me how Honda changed where the ATF filter is, leaving 1 year model unique from all the rest. Then in all their infinite wisdom, decided to put where you can never change it for the next 10 year models. 😤
Perhaps the change to an internal untouchable ATF filter mirrors the no dip-stick needed and life-time fluid goals
 

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Perhaps the change to an internal untouchable ATF filter mirrors the no dip-stick needed and life-time fluid goals
Well the guy who formulated DW-1 should have lost his job then if that was the plan. smirk
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This needs to be a sticky. I've yet to do this on my '05 but I've had to remove the battery tray several times and the last time I did a pseudo practice run to see what I would be dealing with if I ever decided to tackle the job. Amazingly, I was surprised I had as much access to all of those bolts and that was without removing the battery bracket mount which is bolted to the frame. Of course, I wasn't dealing with the guts of the job which is installing the new filter in a cramped space. Thanks again for the informative tutorial...much appreciated!
Removing the battery tray provided a little more room to work with. I think I would have run into only being able to turn some of those bolts 1/8 turn at a time instead of 1/16 of a turn with the tray still in there. And some of the edges on the tray are sharp so having it out reduced the chances of “razor” cuts.

If anyone needs to replace the starter this is the perfect opportunity to replace the ATF filter since everything you need to remove is the same for both jobs. When our starter failed two years ago I remember wishing I had the necessary filter parts on hand, but I didn’t and was under a time crunch to get the Pilot back up and running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well the guy who formulated DW-1 should have lost his job then if that was the plan. smirk
What’s wrong with DW-1? I don’t think this has ever been mentioned before.🤣
 

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Because of this
What’s wrong with DW-1? I don’t think this has ever been mentioned before.🤣
I'll leave it at that. I dont want to foo foo your nice 05 DIY ATF filter replacement thread. 😏
 

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Nice write up. Nice title too.

It's really too bad that this is the case on this. Thanks for posting that too!

Note that this is only applicable to the 2005 Pilot. The 2003 and 2004 Pilot have an external inline filter. The transmission filter on the 2006 and newer Pilots is only serviceable when the transmission is separated from the engine.
 

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I just did this job a couple weeks ago. I did not purchase new crush washers...no leaks yet. I reused the spring and smaller gasket, but replaced the filter cover o-ring.

I also left the battery in place, but removed the air intake.

To get the filter to line up properly, I partially installed the bolts to hold the cover in and then aligned the filter with the banjo bolt to make sure it was in place. Do this without the fluid line.
 

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I just did this job a couple weeks ago. I did not purchase new crush washers...no leaks yet. I reused the spring and smaller gasket, but replaced the filter cover o-ring.

I also left the battery in place, but removed the air intake.

To get the filter to line up properly, I partially installed the bolts to hold the cover in and then aligned the filter with the banjo bolt to make sure it was in place. Do this without the fluid line.
How many miles were on it? Did it look clean? Thanks
 

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Do I have to buy all the filter parts separately, or can I install what appears to be the entirely assembled cartridge style filter? Like the WIX 58129?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That Wix filter assembly appears to be what is used on the 2003 and 2004 Pilot.
 

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Do I have to buy all the filter parts separately, or can I install what appears to be the entirely assembled cartridge style filter? Like the WIX 58129?
If possible, remove Honda's atf filter housing and install Wix/Filtran 58953 that has a large tubular magnet.
147562
 
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