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Had the Pilot for a year now and did my first oil change, total miles driven, 4050 :) Decided to do it myself and I made a mess with the crappy position of the oil filter and the crappy oil filler area. Here are some tips if you decide to do your own oil change/tire rotation.

I used the Walmart plastic ramps and they worked fine. 1st Tip, ensure you have some one guide you up the ramps and chock the rear wheels when you are on the ramps. I put the parking brake on as well. Ensure you are on a level surface.

The oil drain plug is fairly easy to remove and I drained the oil into a large 15 gallon Walmart oil container. Walmart also will take your used oil/filter for free.

The oil filter is a PITA to get to the filter. Some say to turn the right wheel to the right but you can't do that if you use ramps. Use large pliers or one that has a rubber tightening strap. Tip, before you unscrew the oil filter, place a 1 gallon ziploc bag and cover the filter, which equals no mess. Just make sure the oil is not that hot.

Filling the oil: This is where I made a mess, ensure you have one large funnel that fit into the small oil cap area. And DO NOT over pour. Its hard with the five gallon oil jug. Recommendation is to buy a plastic container and pour a quart in at a time, then pour very slowly in the oil filler area. The 19 Pilot takes 5.7 quarts of full synthetic with the oil filter. I used Mobil-1 oil and filter. I put 5 quarts in and then I checked the oil dipstick, then added until it was full.

Rotating tires required one 3 ton jack (I am sure you can use a smaller one but the three ton works well, make sure you get a high lift one and not a low profile jack as the low profile jacks don't go as high. I also used jack stands just to be safe. No tips on this, other than I wash both the inside and outside of the tires with fresh soap/water. I also check for any nails, screws, and abnormal wear on the tires. Tip here, use a magic eraser pad on the wheels to get any grime, ect from the wheels. You can also put wax or polish on the wheels after they are cleaned/dried, this makes them easier to clean for future washing. Amazon sells wheel wax ($18.95) which is amazing wax for the wheels.

I then clean the wheel wells of dirt/debris. Place both tires back on and they look good as new. After driving a few miles, ensure you check all lug nuts again.

And there you have it, I think I spent more on my first oil change, but I know its being done properly. Next oil change should be cheaper. I change my oil and rotate my tires once per year. Cheers.
 

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A few tips on Honda oil changes in general and in specific to the V6 models:
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1. You need to buy the Honda special tool to change the oil filter. (~$20 at your Honda Parts counter, Part # 07AAA-PLCA100) It’s a cap-style tool made of heavy gauge chromed steel that’s formed to fit the end of the filter perfectly, much, much better than the cap wrench tools that are stamped from sheet metal. It has a 17mm hex to turn with the same 17mm wrench ? that you need to loosen the oil drain bolt.
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2.You should also buy the other special tool, the Oil Drain Splash Shield, which prevents oil from the filter slopping all over the subframe when you remove the old filter. ($14 from Snap-On Tools,
Part # VSB02C000049, made by Versafab Corp). This attached under the filter with a magnet, and allows all the oil to be cleanly drained into the drain pan. This is covered in Honda Tools Bulletin III-7-18, and might be orderable from your dealer’s parts counter.
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3. Always replace the aluminum crush washer on the oil pan drain plug with every oil change. These are meant to be used one time only, as they deform when you tighten the drain plug to create an oil-proof seal. Don’t cheap out here, these things cost about 50 cents each, and make the task of doing an oil change much easier.
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4. Tighten the drain plug only to the point when the crush washer has no more “give” in it. It takes some experience to know how to feel for this point when you are tightening the drain plug. It’s also essential to make sure you don’t over-tighten the drain plug, which will strip the oil pan’s threads, necessitating replacement of the oil pan, which takes a whole day to do on the Pilot. Use a torque wrench if you aren’t sure.
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5. When replacing the oil filter, use only the genuine Honda oil filter, to be sure that it incorporates the required bypass valve and meets the requirements of your engine. Pre-fill the new filter with fresh oil, and wait for all of the air bubbles to stop. Put a light film of fresh oil on both sides the filter gasket to keep it from getting distorted when you install it. Before installing the new filter, clean off the oil filter fitting on the engine with a clean rag, and make sure the old gasket is not remaining stuck to the engine.
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6. Install the new filter by hand, carefully to avoid cross-threading it. Tighten the filter according to the instructions printed on the filter. Clean up any oil that may have spilled.
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7. When the engine has cooled off for at least one hour with the hood open, fill the engine with the specified oil to the maximum full mark (but not over-fill) on the dip stick. Start the engine and check that the engine oil light goes out. The light may be lit for 2 or 3 seconds at first, until the new oil has fully circulated through the new filter. Check for leaks (there should not be any leaks or drips).
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8. Take the vehicle for a short drive of 4 or 5 blocks, and check the oil level again, topping up to the full mark on the dip stick if necessary.
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9. Pour all of the used oil into a suitable container (an old motor oil jug is perfect for this), and take the oil and used filter to a recycling center for processing. Used motor oil is very toxic, and causes cancer, so remember to wear heavy duty disposable vinyl gloves to keep it from getting on your hands. As always, dispose of used engine oil and other automotive fluids at the appropriate hazardous chemical facility for the municipality that you live in. If in doubt, consult with the manufacturer of the oil or fluids or chemicals for safe handling and disposal.
 

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Thanks for the tips, but I think everyone has this covered. You obviously don't know about the one gallon Ziploc bag idea. Take your oil filter off while surrounding it with the Ziploc bag. It will catch the oil and the filter. Aside from that tip, I think oil changes are pretty basic. Glad you're doing it yourself and not taking it to one of those butcher shops lol.
 

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Just did mine and used the 1gallon ziplock bag. Worked like a champ. Drained the filter in the bag before removing from the bag and emptied the bag into the waste oil jug.
 
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