Experience Towing 4000+ lb. Boat? - Page 2 - Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums

Register Home Forums Active Topics Insurance Photo Gallery Garage Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Auto Escrow
Piloteers.org is the premier Honda Pilot Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old 11-01-2003, 12:35 AM   #16 (permalink)
Member

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 85
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Booger, mine's only an SO, but pulls my 11,000 lbs quite well

Get about 18 also. Mine was an early 2003, now they're all HO.
__________________
2004 PILOT EXL-RES, White
PADZZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-02-2003, 09:00 AM   #17 (permalink)
Senior Member

 
PSUPilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Philadelphia, PA suburbs
Posts: 288
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by N4TECguy
I don't own a Pilot nor do I tow...but have you guys thought about the brakes? My experience is that brakes on Toyota/Honda are really bad and fry easily when put under extreme stress. If you're going to do those mountain passes, might be a good idea to use a bit (or a lot) of engine braking...or possibly upgrade the rotors to bigger/drilled/slotted ones?
The Pilot's brakes have worked great in the towing that I have done.

A brake upgrade could become a problem, just like any other aftermarket performance upgrade, and brakes are always difficult to increase in size without changing some of other items (i.e. wheels for more clearance). Don't get me started on drilled or slotted rotors, they are pretty much only for racing cars and there is no "real" situation a street car needs them, let alone an SUV.

The Pilot's grade logic does a great job of engine braking for you, and if there were even bigger hills manual shifting might be needed.

My trailer has brakes on both axles, which helps slow things down, and is a requirement by Honda and most states after a specified trailer weight.
__________________
03 Pilot Sage Brush EX-L Navi: Backup camera, towing package, AirLift 1000, side steps, cargo tray, rear splash guards, FS spare, FormFit Air Deflector, debadged, and Zaino - SOLD
2005 S2000 - SOLD
2006 Toyota Tundra 4X4 DC
2006 Civic Hybrid Navi
PSUPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2003, 12:10 PM   #18 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by PSUPilot
brakes are always difficult to increase in size without changing some of other items (i.e. wheels for more clearance). Don't get me started on drilled or slotted rotors, they are pretty much only for racing cars and there is no "real" situation a street car needs them, let alone an SUV.
I think I'm going to disagree with you on that one. I've never driven a Pilot so I can't really comment on the brakes, but I think there are really situations where cross drilled rotors do come in handy. When my family and I go up to Tahoe, there has always been brake fade on the cars we've driven. The brakes must be really really strong if you can load up the Pilot+put on a 4000lb trailer the brakes still don't fade. Also, if you improved the braking system I think you could up the trailer towing capacity a little bit.
N4TECguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2003, 02:34 PM   #19 (permalink)
Senior Member

 
PSUPilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Philadelphia, PA suburbs
Posts: 288
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by N4TECguy
I think I'm going to disagree with you on that one. I've never driven a Pilot so I can't really comment on the brakes, but I think there are really situations where cross drilled rotors do come in handy. When my family and I go up to Tahoe, there has always been brake fade on the cars we've driven. The brakes must be really really strong if you can load up the Pilot+put on a 4000lb trailer the brakes still don't fade. Also, if you improved the braking system I think you could up the trailer towing capacity a little bit.
There are a couple of things we need to take into account here. First, we are talking about a production SUV within the specified limits from the manufacturer. Second, I am just relating my experience of towing, which might be very different than Tahoe, in eastern PA, we do have some big hills but this is not the Sierra Nevada's. Also, when I tow I make sure to anticipate every situation that I can (i.e. if I know a big downhill is coming I slow down beforehand and make sure that I am not riding the brakes all the way down).

After these couple of items are added to the conversation and I give you a little more information, please take my assessment for what it is. Brakes fade, no matter what type of car you are in, if you put them in an extreme situation they will fade. I am sure the Pilot's brakes would fade, I never wanted to lead anyone to believe that they would not. In the years I have spent towing, with multiple different vehicles and different items being towed, the Pilot is a very capable towing vehicle.

Now, drilled brakes and improving the Pilot's towing ability: First, just improving the braking system would not allow you to upgrade the Pilot's towing ability, there are many other factors as to why it was set at the number it was set at by Honda. I am sure there is some extra tolerance built in there but that is another discussion. As far as drilled rotors go, these are used to improve cooling on racing cars. When people began modifying cars this was added for a faster look. Most production cars, outside of Porsche's, Ferrari's, and the like, will not gain a significant benefit from having their rotors drilled out. What you do gain, from drilled or slotted, is faster wear on the pads since now they are working on a rougher surface. Also there is the possibility of premature rotor failure since the structure is actually weakened. Now, if you wanted to do a complete brake system upgrade this is also difficult. I will only touch on this since I am rambling on, front wheel drive cars usually have very small tolerances in their stock wheels for larger brakes. After you upgrade the wheels then the actual brakes, you must think about the master cylinder and all the other brake controlling devices and computers. I would not want to go through all of the work and money just for some braking security, I would just buy a larger vehicle: the Escalade, Tahoe, Yukon, Expedition, Excursion etc.

Let me know if I am not making sense, this is all from a lifetime of reading, driving, and working on cars; but we must never stop learning and maybe there is some more information out there that I need to learn about.
__________________
03 Pilot Sage Brush EX-L Navi: Backup camera, towing package, AirLift 1000, side steps, cargo tray, rear splash guards, FS spare, FormFit Air Deflector, debadged, and Zaino - SOLD
2005 S2000 - SOLD
2006 Toyota Tundra 4X4 DC
2006 Civic Hybrid Navi
PSUPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2003, 05:29 PM   #20 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
josephavincent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Outside Philly
Posts: 13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Question Body...

Has anyone noticed the mounts on their hitches? I am concerned about the unibody getting bent. (I've heard you need a body-on-frame to tow over 1000 lbs.)
josephavincent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2003, 05:59 PM   #21 (permalink)
Registered User
 
N_Jay's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Chicago, NW Burbs
Posts: 14,562
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Re: Body...

Quote:
Originally posted by josephavincent
Has anyone noticed the mounts on their hitches? I am concerned about the unibody getting bent. (I've heard you need a body-on-frame to tow over 1000 lbs.)
The hithc is not an afterthought design like many unibody vehicles.

The Pilot has wahat amounts to a ladder frame designed into the unibody. The hitch attaches to this "frame" at three points with a total of twelve bolts.
The holes have thredded nuts attached to the inside for the frame so all you need to do is thread in the bolts.

If you want to see a picture of the frame without the unibody to better understand there are pictures on the Honda web site.

Most here would probably agree that Honda tends to be conservative with ratings, so I doubt there is any issue safely towing right up to the 4500 LB boat trailer rating.
__________________
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.
Sir Winston Churchill
N_Jay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2003, 06:02 PM   #22 (permalink)
Super Senior Member

 
robrecht's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: East Amwell, New Jersey
Posts: 4,146
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Re: Experience Towing 4000+ lb. Boat?

Quote:
Originally posted by Diemsea
I'm ready to buy a 2004 Pilot but we've also decided that we're going to buy a new boat and I'm concerned about the Pilot's ability to adequately tow the boat with my family and gear so I'm looking for some reassurance. I've read through the manual on towing and it appears we'll be getting close to the tow limits of the Pilot when we have the Pilot loaded with the 2 kids, dog, camping gear and food as well as a 3000lb boat, 800lb trailer, 200lbs of gas in the boat, misc gear in the boat, etc. We live in the Seattle area and like to go over to Eastern Washington for boat trips which is a 3 hour trip and involves going over a mountain pass. I'm hoping to hear from others who tow boats with their Pilots and find out what their experience has been. Thanks.
I'd rather have a Caterpillar diesel than a Cummins, but until Honda puts either one in the Pilot, you might want to check out the V8 Touareg or Cayenne. I think they're both rated at 7,500 lb towing capacity. But they're not as spacious as the Pilot on the inside, of course.
__________________
Thanks, Robrecht!

Charcoalishlygreenishbluishyrealpink&tealfleck metallic EXL-RES with Rumble Seat, Foglights, Chrome Bumper Garnish (of course!), and Merrywang Transport Netting. And an RX-8 or Miata for my twice daily hill climb.
robrecht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2003, 03:34 AM   #23 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Northern Cal
Posts: 1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Cool Boat towing

I've worked for an Acura Dealership since 1996. . .since the introduction of the MDX I have not heard any negative comments on towing a boat. . .The owner of my dealership tows a Malibu SKi Boat. .He's running about the same capacity that you are. . .Boat three kids him and his wife and Gear. . .he has not once complained about the ability of his MDX's. . .THe Pilot is Running a similar engine to the 2001 MDX so I know it can handle your excursion just fine. . .
I currently Own a 2004 EX-L RES in Sage. . .I do drive MDX's every day. . .But I do have to say I love my Pilot. . . .I hope this helps
BobP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2003, 09:17 AM   #24 (permalink)
Member

 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Fayetteville Ga. (about 20 miles south of Atlanta)
Posts: 66
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

With few exceptions, such as the GMC FWD Motorhome (No longer in production) , most heavy duty chassies are rear wheel drive.

My understanding is that there are several reasons for this.

In rear wheel drive units, the transmission can be larger and stronger than the front wheel drive units, which have severe space requirements.

Again with few exceptions (Explorers) most RWD use a large Differential/axle assembly to stabilize and drive the rear wheels. This is driven by a large rugged drive shaft. The coupling from a FWD transmission to it's drive wheels is pale by comparison.

With rear drive units there are very few things between the drive wheels and the tow bar. The drive wheels are attached to the frame through the springs and stabalizers. A couple of feet away, the tow assembly is attached to that same frame. Not much to flex.

With FWD, such as the Pilot, there is a lot of stuff to flex in the distance from the aluminum transmission to the tow bar.

We have an old but nice 1978 Chevy G20 van with modified 350 V8 and 342 gear that we use for towing anything much over 2000#.

The Pilot is reserved for pleasure, light duty off road stuff, long distance comfortable road trips, and light duty towing, such as the Jon Boat or 5X8 trailer.

There are good reasons that the auto mfg are still developing RWD vehicles. Even though FWD is less expensive for them to mfg.

GM, Ford, Nissan,Toyota, and Dodge all have RWD V8 SUVs that would tow that 3500# boat better than the Pilot. Especially on a regular basis.

Will the Pilot tow it? YES But there are much better alternatives.

Why not buy something designed to better do the job. OR
Get the Pilot and buy an older V8 RWD and dedicate it to towing the boat. Keep all the boat or camping thingies in it, ready for the next adventure.

Kip
Kip Kilpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2003, 08:00 AM   #25 (permalink)
dbk
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Boat Towing

I have a few questions for the gentlemen towing the 4300 boat - I am considering the same type of setup and am wondering:

1. Have you had any trouble pulling the boat up slippery launch ramps?

2. Have you tried climbing an 8% grade (we have one hear our house)?

3. Does the two tend to drive the car when you are passed by a big truck traveling at a high rate of speed?

I greatly appreciate any info you can provide.

Thanks!

-Dave
dbk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2003, 10:38 AM   #26 (permalink)
Senior Member

 
PSUPilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Philadelphia, PA suburbs
Posts: 288
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Re: Boat Towing

Quote:
Originally posted by dbk
I have a few questions for the gentlemen towing the 4300 boat - I am considering the same type of setup and am wondering:

1. Have you had any trouble pulling the boat up slippery launch ramps?

2. Have you tried climbing an 8% grade (we have one hear our house)?

3. Does the two tend to drive the car when you are passed by a big truck traveling at a high rate of speed?

I greatly appreciate any info you can provide.

Thanks!

-Dave
I assume I am one of the gentlemen, although no one has ever called me that.

1. No problems on the ramp that I used, it was wet and low tide (Delaware River), but is very rough concrete. I only used VTM-4 lock once and realized that it wasn't worth the effort, in drive the Pilot pulled the boat out fine with no front wheel slippage, which I was worried about.

2. I am not good with grade numbers, unless they are posted on the grade I am climbing it would be a guess. I can tell you that I have climbed what I think are some significant hills (truck speed and gear restrictions posted) with our boat in tow. The Pilot did great IMHO.

3. I assume you are asking about the big truck causing the trailer and Pilot to wander here. In the past I have towed a single axle trailer, this new one is a double axle and it is much more stable, but I don't think that has to do with the Pilot but the trailer.

I hope all that helps, let me know if you have any other questions.
__________________
03 Pilot Sage Brush EX-L Navi: Backup camera, towing package, AirLift 1000, side steps, cargo tray, rear splash guards, FS spare, FormFit Air Deflector, debadged, and Zaino - SOLD
2005 S2000 - SOLD
2006 Toyota Tundra 4X4 DC
2006 Civic Hybrid Navi
PSUPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2003, 12:12 PM   #27 (permalink)
dbk
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Boat Towing

PSUPilot,

That is helpful information, thanks!

-DBK
dbk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2004, 01:27 PM   #28 (permalink)
Senior Member

 
PSUPilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Philadelphia, PA suburbs
Posts: 288
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Re: Re: Boat Towing

Quote:
Originally posted by PSUPilot
2. I am not good with grade numbers, unless they are posted on the grade I am climbing it would be a guess. I can tell you that I have climbed what I think are some significant hills (truck speed and gear restrictions posted) with our boat in tow. The Pilot did great IMHO.
The hill I mentioned earlier in this thread that we both ascended and descended on our way home from the boat dealer was an 8% grade for a little over a mile on both sides (it took two trips to find out that information, one in each direction to read the warning signs).
__________________
03 Pilot Sage Brush EX-L Navi: Backup camera, towing package, AirLift 1000, side steps, cargo tray, rear splash guards, FS spare, FormFit Air Deflector, debadged, and Zaino - SOLD
2005 S2000 - SOLD
2006 Toyota Tundra 4X4 DC
2006 Civic Hybrid Navi
PSUPilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2004, 10:39 AM   #29 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Towing a Boat

Thank you board, & PSUPilot, for your help. I plan to buy a Pilot to tow my 4000 pound rig. I have been using an AWD (front wheel bias) 4-cylinder 1997 Subaru Outback rated at 2000 pounds in flat Florida with no problem whatsoever on ramps or roads so I'm sure the Pilot can do it.

If you want to see some really dumbass, redneck replies to this towing question go to

http://www.caranddriver.com/idealbb/...72F261EC5F3C68
Wanabe Unknown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2004, 06:21 PM   #30 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

I've been towing my boat (4500lbs including trailer, fuel, gear) with the Pilot for a little over a year now and agree it is a very good tow vehicle. In fact, it handles the load and all aspects of towing better than my previous Jeep Grand Cherokee or Ford Explorer which were both RWD and rated for 5500 lbs! I don't know why this is the case... Perhaps a combination of longer wheelbase, wider stance, and tighter structure. I have no problem recommending the Pilot as a solid platform for occasional towing. What a bunch of bafoons on the Car and Driver site!
rnyabeoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:26 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2
Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.
Copyright 2000 piloteers.org. All Rights Reserved.