DIY 2006 ATF change - Honda Pilot - Honda Pilot Forums
 
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 12-31-2013, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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DIY 2006 ATF change

I used some other great write-ups on these forums to change my ATF fluid. Easy job and well worth the time and money savings from having the dealer do it.

Get the engine to normal operating temperature (the fans come on).
Make sure you have 4 or 5 qts of ATF DW-1 fuid. (The book calls for 3.9qts)
Locate the ATF fill bolt. It says ATF on it. It's a 17mm bolt. (Circled in picture below)



It was extremely tight, I was able to break it loose with a torque wrench since it had a longer handle. I used a 3" and 10" extension.

The drain bolt is under the vehicle. It should have some blue paint on it. Use a 3/8" socket wrench to remove it.



The drain plug had some sludge on it from the magnet. The last change was at 40,000 miles and I am at 128,000 now. Probably a little too long to let it go, I plan on doing the drain/fill (not flush) every other oil change or every 3rd.



Wipe off the sludge and put the drain bolt back in when the fluid stops draining. The crush washer was stuck to the transmission, i had to use a screwdriver to knock it off.

Add fluid in the fill bolt using a long narrow funnel and check the dipstick every few ounces after you start the fourth bottle. Mine took almost all 4 qts.

Tighten drain plug to 36ft/lbs and fill plug to 33ft/lbs.

I used new washers for both bolts. Most people probably don't and I won't every time if I am changing it more often in the future, but since it has been so long, I got new ones. They were $8 for both washers, so not cheap! Here are the part numbers and pictures of the new and old ones. The larger one on the right is for the fill bolt.



After putting 3qts in it was starting to show up on the dipstick. 3.5 covered the bottom hole and the second hole was filled when I got down to 4oz left in the 4th bottle.

It took me about an hour since it was my first time. I would expect to be able to do it in 20 min. next time.

Last edited by humanoid; 01-14-2014 at 04:10 PM.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-01-2014, 06:38 PM
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ATF plus

Good Points, when the transmission is topped up with new fluid , I then drop the return line from the radiator, put a clear hose from the rad into a 5 litre jug and turn over the engine till a litre pumps out and refill. 6 or 7 litres later I have a fully cleaned out system. Takes a little longer but I have very little sludge on the drain plug the next time I change the fluid.

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-06-2014, 03:06 PM
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Nice pictures and nice write up. Next time I perform this task I will compose pictures of changing the fluid via disconnecting the radiator hose method.

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-07-2014, 12:58 AM
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Stop using your torque wrench to break bolts loose! It wasn't designed for that and will mess up the calibration. Use a cheater or a breaker.

Thanks for the pics!
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-07-2014, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robs View Post
Stop using your torque wrench to break bolts loose! It wasn't designed for that and will mess up the calibration. Use a cheater or a breaker.

Thanks for the pics!
Although it is not a good practice or recommended to break torque on a nut or bolt hold. Just me, I would have seen the need for a longer tool for more leverage and bought one ahead of time. Some people take on a task without getting all the tools required and then run into a predicament where they now how parts and pieces taken apart and can't get to a store to buy additional tools. So having a tool with leverage handy at the time, I could see how one would use it. After that then go out and buy a breaker bar.

No reason to be so blatant with your post. Another approach is to give the negative affects of useing a torque wrench in this manner rather than for it's intended purpose. The approach I would take:

The negative affects of using a torque wrench to break the torque of a bolt or nut are the following:
1. the springs and inner workings take a beating each time a difficult nut is broken loose
2. unscrewing nuts and bolts will just wear out the springs and the mechanism faster, and the torque readings that it gives will be compromised
3. a torgue wrench is designed to have a precise calibration for a certain number of cycles (3000 to 5000) after those cycles or time period has been met, recalibration is recommended.

"After several heat cycles and the accumulation of dirt and grime that can coat everything in a race car, a bolt can gall against the threads and require a lot more torque to remove than was required to originally install. Most of us don’t watch the torque when loosening bolts, so it’s quite possible to exceed the maximum torque loading of a wrench when breaking bolts loose. The wrench will still function in terms of tightening or loosening bolts, but by exceeding its maximum torque limit loosening that tight bolt may have thrown off the calibration."

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Last edited by Armystrong; 01-07-2014 at 09:18 AM.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
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I do need to get a breaker bar... I figured it wasn't good for the torque wrench, but I didn't know it would damage it. Thanks for the info!
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-13-2014, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armystrong View Post
Although it is not a good practice or recommended to break torque on a nut or bolt hold. Just me, I would have seen the need for a longer tool for more leverage and bought one ahead of time. Some people take on a task without getting all the tools required and then run into a predicament where they now how parts and pieces taken apart and can't get to a store to buy additional tools. So having a tool with leverage handy at the time, I could see how one would use it. After that then go out and buy a breaker bar.

No reason to be so blatant with your post. Another approach is to give the negative affects of useing a torque wrench in this manner rather than for it's intended purpose. The approach I would take:

The negative affects of using a torque wrench to break the torque of a bolt or nut are the following:
1. the springs and inner workings take a beating each time a difficult nut is broken loose
2. unscrewing nuts and bolts will just wear out the springs and the mechanism faster, and the torque readings that it gives will be compromised
3. a torgue wrench is designed to have a precise calibration for a certain number of cycles (3000 to 5000) after those cycles or time period has been met, recalibration is recommended.

"After several heat cycles and the accumulation of dirt and grime that can coat everything in a race car, a bolt can gall against the threads and require a lot more torque to remove than was required to originally install. Most of us donít watch the torque when loosening bolts, so itís quite possible to exceed the maximum torque loading of a wrench when breaking bolts loose. The wrench will still function in terms of tightening or loosening bolts, but by exceeding its maximum torque limit loosening that tight bolt may have thrown off the calibration."

That's a lot of words to say the same thing I just said. Sometimes short and simple is better.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 03:17 PM
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So true...and sometimes people need an explanation or additional information to understand the short and sweet answer. That is the only reason why I provide additional info. Both are on the same sheet of music and hopefully everyone else is to.

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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-15-2014, 01:32 AM
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Quote:
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So true...and sometimes people need an explanation or additional information to understand the short and sweet answer. That is the only reason why I provide additional info. Both are on the same sheet of music and hopefully everyone else is to.
Agreed. And that was a good explanation of why not to use a torque wrench to break bolts .
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-29-2016, 10:28 PM
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This is probably a dumb question but are both the fill and drain bolts the usual "left loose.....right tight"?
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post #11 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-29-2016, 10:41 PM
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^^^^ Yes. But there are no dumb questions. Just dumb answers.
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post #12 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-29-2016, 11:09 PM
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^^^^ yes. But there are no dumb questions. Just dumb answers.
thanks!
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post #13 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-11-2017, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robs View Post
Stop using your torque wrench to break bolts loose! It wasn't designed for that and will mess up the calibration. Use a cheater or a breaker.
The only problem with the cheater/breaker is that sometimes I can't get the correct angle for optimal leverage. I bought a 1/2 drive torque wrench from Harbor Freight ($10 with coupon) and use it solely as a ratcheting breaker bar for these situations. I set the torque setting to maximum before tugging or beating the mallet on the wrench. My other torque wrench, which is only used for bolt/spark plug installation, gets treated a lot more gently.

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post #14 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-26-2017, 01:51 PM
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I don't want to jack this thread but the cost of the crush washers (as shown in post #1) can easily be brought to a reasonable fee with a little searching. In Canada there's place called Spaenar (I'm sure nut/bolt/fastener companies similar exist in the US) where I bought a box of 100 crush washers for each of the oil pan bolt, trans pan bolts, diff bolt. Each box cost $37ish. It's worth seeking these supply places as the stealership fees for an aluminum washer are just stupid.
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post #15 of 15 (permalink) Old 02-25-2017, 09:16 AM
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I've got a MY05 pilot that I'm 2/3rds the way through a 3 step flush. Each time I do this, the trans needs another 1/2 quart or so a week or so after the flush. Is this common?


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