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Old 02-15-2011, 11:55 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Smile DIY (J35A4) valve adjustment

(Proceeded at your own risk/YMMV/disclaimer/etc.)

I noticed slight valve noise from the engine (when cold) this winter and decided to adjust the valves. My 2004 is currently at 118,896 miles and this was the first valve adjustment. This first post shows how to adjust the front 3 cylinders (the rear 3 cylinders will be shown at a later date). It was nice to finally take a glance under the cover to check things out.

Please rate my thread if you find it helpful. Maybe this one will be a sticky (my timing belt DIY was not ).
Thanks

Parts List:
17106-PGE-A01 (front intake manifold cover gasket)
17107-PGE-A01 (rear intake manifold cover gasket)
12030-P8C-A00 (J series-head cover gasket set) (x2)

Procedure:
-Remove plastic engine cover (I leave mine off)
-Remove coil packs (3-6mm allen bolts)
-Remove coil pack wire harness bracket (2-10mm bolts)
-Remove the frontward intake manifold cover (9-5mm allen bolts)
-Remove the 10mm bolt and PCV hose (driver’s side of the front valve cover)
-Remove the 5-10mm valve cover bolts and valve cover
-Turn the steering wheel to the right and insert a 19mm socket into the crank
-Adjust the all 12 valves (when they are off cam) using the tools of your choice
-Reinstall all of the parts in the reverse order of removal (cleaning as you go)
-Don’t forget to remove the wrench from the crank before starting

Photos:
Here are the parts needed:


Plastic cover off:


Front intake cover removed:


Inside of the intake manifold:


Valve cover with coils/bracket/PCV stuff removed:


Close up of the PCV stuff that needs to be removed:


Head with the valve cover removed:


Head with the valve cover removed (2):
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Last edited by Willard; 02-15-2011 at 12:08 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 02-15-2011, 11:56 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Underside of the valve cover:


Valve adjustment tools:


19mm on the crank (please pardon the mess):


Adjustment of exhaust valves:


Adjustment of exhaust valves (close-up):


Adjustment of intake valves:


Adjustment of intake valves (close-up):


Close up of roller rockers:


Intake manifold after some cleaning:


Intake manifold after some cleaning (2):


Various tools used:
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Old 02-15-2011, 12:02 PM   #3 (permalink)
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A few more notes:
-The 4 bolts that hold the 'air horns' onto the intake manifold were 8mm.
-The spark plug tube grommets were a PITA to remove (see pry bar in the tool photo).
-The valve lash information is on the sticker under the hood.
-The valve adjustment tool shown is one like this (10mm):
Amazon.com: Alltrade 648827 10mm 7-1/2-Inch Jam Nut Valve Adjustment Tool: Automotive Amazon.com: Alltrade 648827 10mm 7-1/2-Inch Jam Nut Valve Adjustment Tool: Automotive
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Last edited by Willard; 02-15-2011 at 12:04 PM.
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Old 02-15-2011, 04:30 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Thanks for the writeup and pictures. How much of an improvement in noise did you notice?
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Old 02-15-2011, 04:59 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I've done one valve adjustment before on my 2000 CR-V which I recently sold for an 04 Pilot; this looks similar enough may attempt to do myself if needed (the old B20 engine in the 1st gen CR-V's were prone to tightening up - the Pilot needs to be adjusted IF they make any noise). Great pictures this should be a sticky!
Did you put any gasket grease on the new gaskets? (didn't see it in your parts list) I used black silicone instant gasket last time around.

Last edited by pilot_rave; 02-15-2011 at 05:34 PM.
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Old 02-16-2011, 02:09 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Is the valve adjustment tool just a convenience? I notice on the exhaust valve adjustment, you show using just a conventional 10mm box end and stubby screwdriver.

Nice work.

- Mark
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:58 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whizmo View Post
Is the valve adjustment tool just a convenience? I notice on the exhaust valve adjustment, you show using just a conventional 10mm box end and stubby screwdriver.
+1. Did you do that just to show that there's more than one way to skin the cat?
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Old 02-16-2011, 10:47 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustino8 View Post
How much of an improvement in noise did you notice?
There was a slight reduction in valve noise but the majority of the noise is coming from the rear bank of cylinders.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pilot_rave View Post
Did you put any gasket grease on the new gaskets? (didn't see it in your parts list) I used black silicone instant gasket last time around.
I did not use Hondabond. The cover gasket sits flat (no cam cover humps like the B-series) and did not require sealant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by whizmo View Post
Is the valve adjustment tool just a convenience? I notice on the exhaust valve adjustment, you show using just a conventional 10mm box end and stubby screwdriver.
The tool is very convenient (I only have 2 hands) when there is room to use it. The radiator fans made things a little bit tight on the exhaust side of this head... so I elected to used the box-end and stubby for those 6.
Plus I like skinning cats.

For the rear head... who knows what tool/arm bending/back straining combination will be required.

Just as a point of reference... ~7 of the 12 valves were snug... 3 were very snug and 2 were fine. On average, the snug ones had to be loosened ~1/4 turn (or so).
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Old 02-16-2011, 12:40 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I see you used the guddenteit method for tightening the locknuts. I've adjusted valves once, on my Kawasaki Concours, and if memory serves, the manual had a torque spec for the locknuts. Unless there's some sort of torque combo wrench, I don't see how you'd do it.

Also, I don't know a lot about valves, but from my motorcyling days, I know of 3 types of valve lash adjustment methods: screw & nut, shim & bucket and hydraulic. Supposedly shim & bucket had much longer adjustment intervals than screw & nut, and hydraulic were virtually maintenance-free. The downside of hydraulic was it couldn't withstand high RPMs. So since the Pilot doesn't have a high-revving engine, why wouldn't Honda use a hydraulic system?
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Old 02-16-2011, 08:08 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onu2002 View Post
So since the Pilot doesn't have a high-revving engine, why wouldn't Honda use a hydraulic system?
I think the design trend is toward solid lifters on OHC designs. Doing hydraulics on OHC designs is a bit problematic, probably especially so on a VTEC. And metallurgy and QA/QC has become so much better that solid systems are now holding tolerances for much longer periods, negating any need for the hydraulics.

I've adjusted valves on tens of different motors, car and motorcycle, and I never bothered with torque specs on locknuts. I think I have a pretty good feel for this sort of thing and have never stripped one nor had one loosen. This pretty precision tooling in this area so anything reasonable should be fine. If you were worried about it, I'd check the torque of a couple after to calibrate your wrist. Or snug them somewhat less than spec while holding both the wrench and screwdriver, then remove the screwdriver and do a final torque with a socket. You, of course, always want to re-check clearances after you torque the locknut.

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Old 02-16-2011, 09:20 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Wow That's not something a normal shade tree mechanic will screw around with. Thanks!
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:43 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carguy07 View Post
Wow That's not something a normal shade tree mechanic will screw around with. Thanks!
It's actually pretty straightforward as these things go. I'd probably tackle this long before I'd try and do the 105K timing belt/water pump repair.

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Old 02-16-2011, 10:28 PM   #13 (permalink)
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All I can add- if you are determining by noise whether to adjust valves, try using one of these-

Amazon.com: Lisle 52500 Mechanic's Stethoscope: Automotive Amazon.com: Lisle 52500 Mechanic's Stethoscope: Automotive


Engine stethoscope. It may save you from pulling off the front cover if all of the noise is coming from under the rear, or verse visa. If your noise goes away after checking under the noisy cover, then no need to look under the other cover.

And I'm pretty sure all valve adjustments are done on a cold engine. It's important, look it up to be sure.
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:09 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Thank you very much for your very clear instructions and excellent pictures. I have the factory service manual but this is much better.

I have one question. I was under the impression that you have to remove the timing belt cover (or a section of it) to get access to the crank to turn it. You didn't mention removing a cover. Is there a little window or, if not, how did you access the nut? I can't quite make it out in the picture. I'll find out when I do the job next week but it would be nice to know that detail ahead of time, if possible.

One other thing: Did you get to the back bank yet? If so, how did it go? Was it a pain to access everything?

Again, thank you very much! I can't imagine anyone doing a finer job of explaining the procedure than what you have done. I really appreciate it.
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Old 06-09-2011, 02:57 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZoneIII View Post
Thank you very much for your very clear instructions and excellent pictures. I have the factory service manual but this is much better.

I have one question. I was under the impression that you have to remove the timing belt cover (or a section of it) to get access to the crank to turn it. You didn't mention removing a cover. Is there a little window or, if not, how did you access the nut? I can't quite make it out in the picture. I'll find out when I do the job next week but it would be nice to know that detail ahead of time, if possible.

One other thing: Did you get to the back bank yet? If so, how did it go? Was it a pain to access everything?

Again, thank you very much! I can't imagine anyone doing a finer job of explaining the procedure than what you have done. I really appreciate it.
You can access the crank from the passenger side wheel well (see the blue Honda oil filter in the pic above?). Nothing to remove just turn the steering wheel all the way to the right to make more space to work with.
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