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Old 05-02-2009, 07:44 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Unhappy Oil Pan Nightmare

I'm in a hell of a dilema. I was doing a typical oil changed and notice shavings from the oil pan grove come out with the drain plug. I used a new drain plug and tried to tighten it because not all the groves in the pan are missing. But I can't get it back to torque. My fear is now I have to change the oil pan (which according to the service manual looks like I have to go through hell to get to it) Please tell me there's a easier way to solve this problem with the stripped groves or a simplier way to remove the oil pan without having to drain the tranny, disconnect tie rods, front and rear tranny mount, etc. etc. ANYONE! Please help.
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Old 05-02-2009, 08:38 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I think this is a common problem in the automotive world. Talk to a local mechanic and see what they do. In one of my other cars, this happened, and they tapped a larger diameter thread there and put a different bolt. For now, just put teflon tape on it and see if it keeps the oil from leaking. That way, you can at least temporarily drive it until Monday.
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Old 05-02-2009, 10:14 PM   #3 (permalink)
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one of the options that i have seen is a rubber plug that expands on the inside to seal the hole, last for a long time and it comes with the tool to remove and insert the plug
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Old 05-02-2009, 11:03 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default Re: Oil Pan Nightmare

Quote:
Originally posted by THonda
I'm in a hell of a dilema. I was doing a typical oil changed and notice shavings from the oil pan grove come out with the drain plug. I used a new drain plug and tried to tighten it because not all the groves in the pan are missing. But I can't get it back to torque. My fear is now I have to change the oil pan (which according to the service manual looks like I have to go through hell to get to it) Please tell me there's a easier way to solve this problem with the stripped groves or a simplier way to remove the oil pan without having to drain the tranny, disconnect tie rods, front and rear tranny mount, etc. etc. ANYONE! Please help.
Who has been doing the oil changes?

Do you have any recourse?
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Old 05-03-2009, 08:13 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: Re: Oil Pan Nightmare

Quote:
Originally posted by N_Jay


Who has been doing the oil changes?

Do you have any recourse?

I've been doing the changes since I bought it new. So the only recourse is kicking myself for not paying closer attention between changes. I have been using new plugs whenever I saw the bolt beginning to strip on the outside. But I never thought I would have a prob with the threads on the pan. I like the idea of using the Fumuto drain valve if I can get it to fit snugged with only 1/2 mm of thread left at the back end of hole.
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Old 05-03-2009, 02:07 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Default Re: Oil Pan Nightmare

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Originally posted by THonda
Please tell me there's a easier way to solve this problem with the stripped groves.
You're in luck. You have 3 solutions:
1. Get a heli-coil kit at your local auto parts store. They'll show you how it use it. It's critical to get the correct size (hint: think metric).
2. Read this (from Honda Service Notes, 3/05:

TIME-SERT Thread Repair Kits: The Solution for Stripped
Head Bolt or Aluminum Oil Pan Drain Plug Threads
Got a vehicle with stripped head bolt threads in
the engine block or stripped drain plug threads in
an aluminum oil pan? The Honda Tool and
Equipment Program has some cool tools to help
you out.

For stripped drain plug threads in an aluminum oil
pan, the Drain Plug Repair Kit M14x1.5
(P/N TFC1415C) is the ticket. This kit services
’98–02 Accords, ’03–05 Accords, ’96–00 Civics,
’01–05 Civics, ’04–05 Elements, ’99–04 Odysseys,
’05 Odysseys, and ’03–05 Pilots.
Each kit includes all the stuff you need to install
TIME-SERT® inserts. All you need to add is a tap
wrench and some cutting fluid. A kit typically
includes a drill fixture, drill bushing, drill bit,
alignment pin, tap, insert driver, and a supply of
inserts. You also get some LocTite and driver oil.
If you’re not already familiar with TIME-SERT®
inserts, here are a few facts about them:
• It’s a threaded, solid bushing insert made by
the Time Fastener Company (they’re in Reno,
Nevada) for repairing stripped or damaged
threads. It’s easy to install and allows for full
load use of the tapped hole, ensuring
protection against stress and vibration.
• It’s thin-walled so you can install it in tightfitting
areas.
• It’s self-positioning. There’s a flange on the top
of the insert that ensures positive placement
and keeps the insert from winding down into
the newly repaired hole.
• It’s self-locking. When you install the insert,
the bottom internal threads are cold-rolled to
expand the mating external threads into the
base material, locking the insert in place.

To order any of these kits, call the Honda Tool and
Equipment Program at 888-424-6857.

3. Replace oil pan.

Finally, Honda says the crush washer must be replaced at every oil change. Oh sure, you'll hear all sorts of folks who will claim otherwise, but just maybe, Mother Honda has thought this one out pretty carefully. The parts department has boxes of them. Get the right size for the oil drain bolt. Although I now use Mobil1 filters, when I bought the blue Honda oil filter from the parts counter, it came wrapped in plastic, and included a crush washer. With the use of a new crush washers at every oil change, and application of the proper torque, you'll not have to revisit this problem again.
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Old 05-03-2009, 02:47 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Default Re: Re: Re: Oil Pan Nightmare

Quote:
Originally posted by THonda



I've been doing the changes since I bought it new. So the only recourse is kicking myself for not paying closer attention between changes. I have been using new plugs whenever I saw the bolt beginning to strip on the outside. But I never thought I would have a prob with the threads on the pan. I like the idea of using the Fumuto drain valve if I can get it to fit snugged with only 1/2 mm of thread left at the back end of hole.
Not to tell you what you already know, but you were probably over-tightening it every time.

Did you use new crush washers?
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Old 05-03-2009, 04:49 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Default Re: Re: Re: Oil Pan Nightmare

Quote:
Originally posted by THonda
I have been using new plugs whenever I saw the bolt beginning to strip on the outside.
Properly torqued, you should never see either the bolt or the pan threads "beginning to strip". You should be able to reuse and retorque the drain bolt literally hundreds of times, regardless of whether you use a new crush washer or not. (Replacement of the crush washer precludes leaking at the proper torque, but it doesn't change the torque the threads see one iota. And it goes without saying that "more torque" is not a proper fix for a leaking/reused crush washer.)

You're doing something very wrong.

- Mark
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Old 05-03-2009, 06:46 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Oil Pan Nightmare

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Originally posted by whizmo
. . . .
(Replacement of the crush washer precludes leaking at the proper torque, but it doesn't change the torque the threads see one iota. And it goes without saying that "more torque" is not a proper fix for a leaking/reused crush washer.) . . .

While more torque is not the proper fix, it is often the common fix!
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Old 05-06-2009, 11:23 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I bought a Husky torque wrench at my local Lowes hardware for about $60. This was a great investment. I tend to be heavy handed and feared that I would strip the drain pan's threads. I set my torque wrench to 29 ft/lbs and use a new crush washer every oil change.
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Old 05-09-2009, 06:08 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Smile Re: Re: Re: Re: Oil Pan Nightmare

Quote:
Originally posted by whizmo


Properly torqued, you should never see either the bolt or the pan threads "beginning to strip". You should be able to reuse and retorque the drain bolt literally hundreds of times, regardless of whether you use a new crush washer or not. (Replacement of the crush washer precludes leaking at the proper torque, but it doesn't change the torque the threads see one iota. And it goes without saying that "more torque" is not a proper fix for a leaking/reused crush washer.)

You're doing something very wrong.

- Mark
Sorry I haven't replied sooner guys but shortly after these postings i discovered a excellent device that I wish I had known about years ago. I purchased/installed the oil drain valve (www.fumotousa.com) and my worries are over about stripped threads or plugs. With this device I don't have to ever unscrew the plug. FYI, I never had a leak problem with the Pilot since I bought it, but perhaps a bit heavy handed at times. At any rate, I just wanted to thank everyone's comments and advise concerning this issue. Thanks again guys.
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